Careers Guidance

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Careers Guidance

Postby Andy » Fri Sep 12, 2008 11:04 am

I have an appointment with the careers people today never nseen the guy once when I was at school. Am in college 4 weeks and there you go seeing someone today
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Postby parnassus » Sun Sep 14, 2008 12:26 pm

I hope the meeting is useful, Andy. I had careers advice when I was in the last year of my GCSEs, but it was only offered to me as I was in the bottom set for one of my subjects (maths). A Connexions advisor came in to talk to all the bottom-setters about our post-GCSE options. I had been a little perturbed as to why I had been receiving Connexions leaflets enthusing about NVQs in hairdressing and construction and several other things that I would be useless at, but at least the careers meeting explained it.

I wish that the advice service had been offered to all the students, and not just those who were in a low set for something. At the time I was wondering what to study at university - one of my three big interests (English literature, theology, Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies) or something that would lead directly into an interesting job (speech and language therapy). I would have appreciated some proper guidance with that, but I didn't get it.
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Postby Danni » Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:27 pm

At my school everyone got it. The careers advisor didn't really give me any advice, but I was already pretty certain I wanted to work in computing anyway.
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Postby Steph » Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:01 pm

I saw a careers advisor several times at secondary school-she always advised me to go into teaching-I'm not interested in teaching at all now! I also saw one at university and he was a lot more helpful and remarkably patient when I came to him with 25 different career plans-he still printed a job description of each position out and went through it with me.
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Postby Andy » Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:13 am

Although they were very helpful I didnt really get anything useful out of it actually I would have been better listening to my parents 2years ago cos I havnt got the qualifications to do what I now fancy doing so am on a bit of a bummer mood just now :(
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Postby parnassus » Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:28 am

What qualifications do you need? It may still possible for you to get them. You have plenty of time ahead of you.
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Postby Creative » Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:33 am

I have careers support. The service is called Connextions but it will stop when I'm 25 which is not long now. I'm not looking forward to that as my connextions worker is fantastic and a real support.

Hope you get on ok Andy.
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Postby C » Wed Sep 17, 2008 12:51 pm

I received a little careers guidance while at school but not very much. I had an interview in years 9, 10 and 11 about what I'd like to do when I was older. My first and second interviews came from a careers guidance person outside of the school, whilst my third interview, in year 11, came from a teacher who knew me personally (she had taught me RE for a year). The first and second interviews I didn't find particularly helpful; they were literally about 15 minutes with someone I didn't know and who knew nothing of me. I in my year 9 one I was struggling a bit with the school work and telling her I had dyspraxia then I said 'sometimes things seem to 'click' with me later than with others. I'll sit in the classroom and won't understand for a long time and then suddenly I'll just understand it all at once.' She replied 'Could it just be that you weren't paying attention before?' :roll: My third careers interview was somewhat more helpful as it was with someone who knew me and had a good understanding of the problems I'd had. By this time, though, I was in year 11, about to leave school and had already decided I wanted to study childcare at college and was in the process of applying. So all she could really say was 'Oh good, you already know what to do!' Career options were also covered briefly in PSE lessons during tutorial time but in no great depth.

In hindsight I do think everyone should receive a substantial amount of careers guidance at school from about year nine - maybe one timetabled hour every few weeks, or at least once a term.
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Postby kerrianne92 » Wed Sep 17, 2008 4:16 pm

At my school there is one person you can go and see for advice about careers but I went once and found that i felt really shy and a bit scared. I think it was mainly because i hadnt ever seen her before so i was nervous anyway but she was asking me all sorts of questions i didnt know (she wanted to know what i wanted to do when i left skool, if i had any ideas at all about what i wanted) and i found that she was not very helpful at all
They will not force us, They will stop degrading us, They will not control us, We will be victorious - Muse
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Postby Creative » Wed Sep 17, 2008 6:36 pm

I have been very lucky. Because of my dyspraxia I have a connextions worker who works with people with special needs.

The first one I had wasn't very understanding about dyspraxia but luckily I got a different one shortly before I left college.
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Postby fraser » Wed Sep 17, 2008 7:22 pm

I've just found out today that this semester I'm going to have a one-hour lecture each week, on "Employability and Career Planning". Should be interesting...
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Postby Danni » Wed Sep 17, 2008 10:46 pm

I get four lessons (45 minutes each) on Employability tomorrow (and every Thursday) at college, followed by an hour of Practical Work Skills. Should be interesting.
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Postby Creative » Mon Sep 22, 2008 6:17 pm

Connextions is available in most places in the UK according to their website so lots of you should be able to accsess their support. If you ask to see one for special needs then they can see you up to age 25. This is well worth doing. They refered me for mentoring which was really helpful.
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Postby parnassus » Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:23 pm

Creative wrote:Connextions is available in most places in the UK according to their website so lots of you should be able to accsess their support. If you ask to see one for special needs then they can see you up to age 25. This is well worth doing. They refered me for mentoring which was really helpful.


The adviser whom I met was from Connexions. In my school she was brought in to interview those of us who weren't expected to perform well at GCSE, so my impression of their services may well be faulty, but I found the whole approach quite defeatist. My dyslexic friend Emma shared her ambition of studying English at university with the Connexions adviser, who responded, "My daughter is dyslexic too. She'd never cope with all that reading. Hadn't you better look at something else?" Emma was indignant about it, but shaken enough to choose social work instead. The adviser was different with me - once I'd told her that I planned to apply to Cambridge and study English, she asked me for my predicted grades and then just wished me luck. The quality of the service might be different elsewhere, though.
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Postby Creative » Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:50 am

It can all depend on who your connextions Personal Adviser is and what they are like.

Once at my special college one came to talk to us about careers options and because most of the students couldn't read very well she mentioned lots of practical work and nothing else. This upset me a lot at the time and I think this approach is silly. All the young people are individuals with different skills and abilities.

Mine is very good and understands my problems. My last one was very pressurising and had an unrealistic expectation of the sort of work I might be able to do.
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