The last time someone did something for you...

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

The last time someone did something for you...

Postby MontyDyspraxia » Wed Jun 23, 2010 10:14 am

Because you couldn't/didn't how to do it. Me, it was last night. My headphone wires got tangled up in my shirt as I was changing for bed :lol:
"When we kiss, it feels like a flying saucer landing" ~ Strange Powers by The Magnetic Fields

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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Steph » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:13 am

Yesterday afternoon. I couldn't untangle the seatbelt on the minibus going swimming so a member of staff from one of the college houses had to do it for me.
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby abi » Wed Jun 23, 2010 3:59 pm

this moring, i had to get a friend to write my name on a register/list, the box was too small for me
the way i see it, dyspraxia is an extra hurdle in every race i run, but that extra hurdle, is just extra exercise, so in the end, i will come through stronger.
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Rosie-posie » Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:58 pm

someone helped me move the water tray in from outside as i got it stuck in the door.
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Fenrir » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:18 pm

I...cant actually remember :( Well, i do currently have a friend helping me get with this girl by hinting i like her etc. Mainly cause im just bad at giving out signals and talking to girls normally, but this is helping to break the barrier a bit :)
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Macha » Sat Jun 26, 2010 8:42 am

My parents often cut open rolls and stuff for me to make sure half of it doesn't end up on the floor and stuff. So, about a week ago was last time.
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Remus » Sun Jun 27, 2010 6:43 pm

The other week, my head of school/old mentor had to sign an identification something and put his passport number down for my finance forms.
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Lawzy » Thu Jul 22, 2010 8:41 pm

I can't remember I tend to try and do everything myself. I have strategies for everything I find difficult, it might take me longer but I get the job done :).
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Re: The last time someone did something for you...

Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Thu Jul 22, 2010 10:01 pm

I used to feel bad about people "doing stuff for me".

Then I read this:

And, because disability is so identified with dependence, let me talk for a moment about that.
I am a dependent person. I eat food whose final preparation I handle myself, but which has come to me across roads laid and maintained by other people from stores staffed by other people -- and even those people didn't grow or raise or harvest or slaughter any of it. I wear clothes made by other people from cloth woven by still others. I am human: I depend on others. And this is called independence.

I am a dependent person. I need human contact, most of which I receive through an Internet built and maintained by many other people. I do not know my neighbors, but even face-to-face interaction requires someone's cooperation. I have learned from my time in isolation rooms that I can handle a while without human interaction, but that eventually it will become unbearable. I am human: I depend on others. And this is called independence.

I am a dependent person. The words I work with were taught to me by people who wrote and read them before I traced my first A. The language I work in is a living entity, shaped and grown over centuries by billions upon billions of speakers. The ideas I work on are part of a tradition nurtured by many thinkers. I am human: I depend on others. And this is called independence.

I am a dependent person. I do not -- have learned that I cannot safely -- live alone. I require the patterns of life to be modeled for me over and over again. I struggle to get, and to keep, jobs in workplaces designed for "plug-and-play" workers. I learn some things quickly and easily; I need to be explicitly taught many things that seem obvious to others. I am human: I depend on others. And this is called dependence.

Independent can mean self-governing. It can also mean self-reliant. It can deny others' influence on our decisions or others' support in carrying those decisions out.

Dependent can mean controlled by others. It can also mean requiring the support of others.

None of us, of course, is independent in either sense. We grow up in social contexts, supported and denied, enabled and disabled by those around us.

But some rely on supports which are so common as to go unnoticed, while others use support that is atypical and therefore apparent. Some supports are provided by the community as a whole and go unnoticed, while others are borne -- or not -- by a small number of people whose lives are profoundly affected.

So I know the ways in which I am dependent not by looking at how I depend on others, but by watching other people. I look to nondisabled people to tell me which kinds of dependence are recognized, which are devalued. I know the shame that comes with asking for "inappropriate" help.

Within the disability community, too, there are fault lines around which kinds of dependence we recognize, which kinds we devalue


http://www.raggededgemagazine.com/0501/0501cov.htm
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