dyspraxic cooking guide

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dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby whizz pop bang » Sun Jul 04, 2010 2:28 pm

hey guys

i was making a bannana cake earlier and i had an idea, my idea was to make a sort of cooking program tailored for dyspraxic teens like me and all of you guys on this site, i dont really struggle very much with cooking the only things i do struggle with are keeping the kitchen tidy (ooops) and remembering what to do, and working out portion sizes.

i think what i would do is introduce what im gonna make then as i go through the ingredients i could maybe put i slide in with all the ingredients so that people can pause the video to write them down, then once ive done that i would then take you through a step by step guide on how to cook the item we are making i wouldnt go too fast as i am quite slow at cooking so i think other dyspraxic people would be able to keep up with me.

i think its a good idea as i know a lot of people my age (17) and older dont really cook either because they forget what to do or they are afraid they might burn something or they might not know how to cook, they can be dyspraxic or not dyspraxic either way my guide would be there to help anyone learn to cook which in the long run would give people who watch it more independance and a new life skill.

at the moment i know quite a few things to cook, some of them are not from scratch but its a start for anyone new to cooking or wanting to try new things

here is a list of things i know how to cook already:

bananna cake
chocolate cake
chicken curry and rice
thai green curry and rice
chilli con carnie and rice
beef/chicken cassarole
beef/bacon stew
chicken and bacon carbonara with tagletteli pasta
spaghetti bolognase
pork or lamb with rosemary and garlic potatoes
chicken, chips and salad
gammon with mash, green beans and gravy OR with chips


if any of you are interested in me making the video guides please reply and also if anyone is interested in learning a meal that is not on their i would be more than happy to teach myself and then make a guide once im not burning things (oops)

cheers

whizz x
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby parnassus » Sun Jul 04, 2010 2:37 pm

This is a brilliant idea! There are a couple of other good cooks and bakers on DT whose recipes and techniques I would like to see. (Alice...) I struggle with cooking and I don't have a video camera, but I would be happy to post very simple step-by-step instructions with photographs for the meals I know how to make. I can do the following:

Vegetarian meals
Couscous-stuffed peppers.
Potato and spinach curry.
Variations on the potato and spinach theme (cauliflower curry, etc).

Meat-based meals
Chicken or beef or turkey stir-fry (the first meal I ever learnt how to cook!)
Spaghetti bolognese.
Chicken cooked in tomato sauce with apricots, served with rice.

Side dishes
Garlic potatoes.
Roasted vegetables.

Things I can bake
Bread-and-butter pudding
Chocolate tiffin (a kind of biscuit cake with raisins)
Chocolate orange cake.

Things I would like to learn how to make:
Decent soups. My attempts at soup always go horribly wrong.
Lemon chicken in a thick glutinous sauce. One that I can make myself, not one that I have to get out of a jar.
Pastry.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Sun Jul 04, 2010 3:41 pm

I can be of help with soups. I have a digital camera which can take videos. I will make one when I have the chance.
(Vegetarian main dishes are light green, vegan main dishes are dark green, meat main dishes are read, puddings are pink)
Soups I can make:
Broccoli and Stilton
French Onion Soup
Tomato, red pepper and goat's cheese
Sweet Potato and sweetcorn
Cauliflower and coconut
Carrot and parnsnip
Lentil mushroom and ginger soup


Other things I can make:
Spanish omelette
Tomato, rice and bacon tray-bake
Vegetable and tofu stir-fry
Meat and vegetable pie
Shepherd's pie

Veggie version of shepherd's pie
Thai green chickpea curry

Sponge cake
Almond Cake
Chocolate cake
Bread and Butter pudding
Gingerbread
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby MontyDyspraxia » Sun Jul 04, 2010 5:05 pm

I can make cheese on pasta, cheese omelettes and scrambled eggs. That's about it :lol:
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby abi » Sun Jul 04, 2010 6:40 pm

i hav been forced to cook loads, i had to be able to do a full sunday roast by the time i was 8. i cant do much well though
the way i see it, dyspraxia is an extra hurdle in every race i run, but that extra hurdle, is just extra exercise, so in the end, i will come through stronger.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Alice » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:32 pm

I'm quite competant at most cooking, but I'm lazy with timing multiple components since I eat foods seperately anyway. I tend to stick to simple meals on a day to day basis because I have a tight schedule.

My idiot proof fallback meals are:
Pasta
Tuna pasta bake
Pasta and tomato sauce
Mixed vegetable pasta
Couscous

RiceSweet and sour
Bean chilli
Special fried rice

Potatoes
Jacket potatoes
Lamb chops with roast potatoes
Bangers and Mash
Potato cakes

Bread
Grilled pepper and humous bagel
Greek salad wrap

Other
Mixed roast vegetables
Vegetable soup (also known as whatever-looks-like-it's-on-the-turn soup lol)
Beanburgers and homemade chips

Pepole often mistake me for a vegetarian (The lamb and tuna are the ones I eat the least, and this pattern extends to eating out), I just find it cheaper and easier to eat vegetarian food and find that meat low quality meat is often used to disguise a lazily seasoned dish.
Last edited by Alice on Mon Jul 05, 2010 4:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Steph » Sun Jul 04, 2010 9:18 pm

Everyone can cook so much more than me :( It makes me feel ashamed as I am older than most of you in this thread :( I can cook spaghetti bolognaise, spaghetti with meatballs and scrambled eggs. I keep trying omelettes but they always go wrong. I would like to learn how to cook a lot more-I think this is a brilliant idea for a thread.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Spoon » Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:28 pm

as some of you know, i have quite a lot of difficulty with fatigue and this can cause problems with cooking. I can generally cook well. When i have moved to my own home i will adapt my recipes and do videos too.

This is a great idea for a thread!
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby abi » Mon Jul 05, 2010 8:37 am

ifyou want to learn to cook, and find it hard, try to write (or type) a list of what you have to do, and include times. keep this list visible.
example (please note that this is not a rescapie i have tried, its just an example of how to lay out the timings):
have ready:
- large saucepan or frying pan with lid
- spoon (or similar of stirring)
- knife a chopping board
- pyrex dish
- oven gloves or a cloth for lifting hot pans/dishes
- pot rest if needed for your surface
- another, smaller saucepan, for the white sauce
- another spoon for stirring the sauce
- flower seive
- cheese grater
- blunt/table knife to test the lasanga to see if its done (you can get this later if you wat, as you have an hour)
- TIMER, preferably one with an alarm
- measuring spoons & jugs, and if you like to pre-measure, small containers to put measured amounts into

food needed (have it all ready and layed out before you start):
1 table spoon of olive oil
Cracked black pepper
½ pint of beef stock or similar
500g of lean steak mince
100g of mushrooms
1 large chopped red onion
¼ clove of garlic (or to taste)
15 grams of tomato concentrate
1 tin of quality chopped tomatoes
1 packet of lasagna sheets/preferably green, (Verdi)
300ml of milk
150g of grated chedder
20g of butter
25g of plain flour

to finish at about 5:45 - 6:00 (you may need to adjust times to have extra preperation time if you have difficulty using a knife)
4:05 - chop all items that need chopping - onion, garlic, mushroom and grate cheese. if you want to, measure out all the amounts so you dont have to worry while cooking
4:20 - place pan on low heat with oil in (you can continue chopping after you have done this, untill the next instruction)
4:25 - add onions and turn to a medium/high heat - allow to heat for about half a minute, than add garlic
4:26 - add mince, and continue to fry onion, garlic, and mince (in the same pan) untill meat is brown (about 5 minutes) add the pepper if you want it.
4:30 - add tomato add tomato concentrate, then mushrooms and stir
4:31 - add stock and chopped tomato, cover with a lid, and place on the lowest possible heat to simmer while you work on the sauce
4:32 - place the smaller pan on a low heat and start the butter melting
4:33 - ensure butter has melted, then seive in flour, with no lumps. stir
4:34 - add milk (it helps to add it a little at a time). stir
4:35 - increase heat to medium/high and add cheese. stir continously while you do this.
4:40 - turn oven on to 180 degrees C (adjust if needed)
4:40 - (after turning oven on) into the pyrex dish add a layer of the meat and tomato sauce, then pasta, and keep alternating untill you have got enough in the dish
4:59 - set up timer for 45 minutes
5:00 - place dish (with food still in it :lol: ) in the oven, and start timer
5:00-5:45 - make any side dishes needed, i suggest garlic bread and salad. (this may require you to start earlier, so untill you are used to it, choose something you can do in the time not taken with the main part of the meal)
5:45 - using gloves (oven gloves that go a little way up the arm stop you burning your wrists on the sides and door fo the oven) or a cloth, remove dish from the oven and poke a knife through, the knife should go through easily and the food should feel soft. if it is soft, take out and serve, if not, replace in the oven, and check evry 5 - 10 minutes in the same way.
5:45-6:00 - serve, with any side dishes.

http://www.godine.co.uk/blog/lasagna-recipe

any rescapie can be layed out like this, and after a while you can get used to it. dont rely on my instructions alone, look through the instructions on the link if you actually want to try it.
like i said, i havent actually done this particular one, its just an example. any comments and improvements are welcome. the timings are set out to my ability, you night need to increase (or decrease) preperation time.

if i get a chance, i will put more on here.
the way i see it, dyspraxia is an extra hurdle in every race i run, but that extra hurdle, is just extra exercise, so in the end, i will come through stronger.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby whizz pop bang » Mon Jul 05, 2010 9:16 am

well a lot of you know how to cook already thats good to see and thanks for all the feedback i will try and start dong videos of me cooking meals as im normally the one who cooks tea every evening (apart from roast to many components!!!) i dont know when i will start hopefully tommorow and it will take me a while to edit the videos and put in the slide of ingredients or what i could do is show the ingredients layed out and i have loads of sticky notes that i could stick on them (to save me from disater as i am absoultly crap with editing videos and putting slides in etc) i also need to actually get a video editing program on my computer as i dont have any (i think) i will probably try and get windows movie maker or borrow someone elses computer with it on so i can edit the vidoes quicker and get them up sooner, i will probably post them up on youtube and put the links up on here if you want you can subscribe to my profile which is whizzerlovesdt (dont ask i was 15 when i created an account and was abit mad about david tennant lol) i will try and get them done soon and i hope you can all give me some feed back on them

cheers

whizz 8) x
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Cynamon » Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:34 pm

I can't help with the guide, but I'd love to see it up and learn how to cook :mrgreen:
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby parnassus » Mon Jul 05, 2010 4:35 pm

Steph wrote:Everyone can cook so much more than me :( It makes me feel ashamed as I am older than most of you in this thread :( I can cook spaghetti bolognaise, spaghetti with meatballs and scrambled eggs. I keep trying omelettes but they always go wrong. I would like to learn how to cook a lot more-I think this is a brilliant idea for a thread.


Do you ever cook at work, Steph? It is my job that has made me more confident at cooking - we take it turns to support the students to cook an evening meal. Each student has one or two cooking nights a week, depending on the size of the accommodation. (Some have only got three students while others have five or six.) We have got several recipes written in very easy English (for the students who are literate) and completely pictorial recipes for the ones who can't read. The purpose of this informal education is to build up their skills step by step, which means that new students start with very easy meals and progress to more challenging ones. There is also a philosophy of learning through your mistakes, with staff not taking over from the students but encouraging them to do as much as they can by themselves. This has been a real gift to me, as when I started work I could only make one meal (stir-fry). Through teaching the students, I have learnt a lot myself. Sometimes I think that the independent living skills curriculum that we have for people with learning disabilities would be very useful for dyspraxics as well - it's patient, it's thorough, and it's effective.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Steph » Mon Jul 05, 2010 5:24 pm

Unfortunately I do not cook at work as we have a chef who works in the canteen who does 8 hours overtime a week cooking us all dinner. He is Portuguese and sends money home to his family in Portugal hence the overtime. In the college houses, the students make their own menus and staff help them to prepare them so if I get a transfer to a college house, it will probably help me learn to cook.
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Henri » Mon Jul 05, 2010 5:45 pm

Reading the list of recipes that everyone can cook here, I must say I'm extremely impressed. I have never felt confident about cooking, but thankfully, I have always had supportive people around who have taught me the basics. The support network you have around you really does make the difference, but sometimes being flung out into the unknown, outside of your comfortable surroundings, can propel you to help yourself further. For me, the propellor was when I went to university. I learned to cook in ways that initially seemed to be insurmountable tasks. Now, I can cook most basic things, but I'm still reluctant to try anything more complex (and potentially, very messy!). A large part of being Dyspraxic seems to be able to accurately judge your capacity to do certain things, and one of the best ways to do that is through experience; if you feel you want to try a new recipe, go for it, but be prepared for it to go wrong.
Feel free to contact me about anything on hrapson@gmail.com
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Re: dyspraxic cooking guide

Postby Spoon » Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:32 pm

Most recently my cooking improved as I started to get ill. I started experimenting to get a perfect balanced healthy meal. There's not so many recipes for that so I started learning what went with what just by trial and error. A lot of my cooking is 'a spash of this' and 'a drizzle of that' because I get bored following recipes!
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