Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

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Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Fri Jul 09, 2010 7:39 am

The previous version of this post was not very welllayed out. Here is version 1.2

Social interaction
The lack of demonstrated empathy is possibly the most dysfunctional aspect of Asperger syndrome. Individuals with AS experience difficulties in basic elements of social interaction, which may include a failure to develop friendships or to seek shared enjoyments or achievements with others (for example, showing others objects of interest), a lack of social or emotional reciprocity, and impaired nonverbal behaviors in areas such as eye contact, facial expression, posture, and gesture.[1]

I do not like to make eye contact. I hate it.and have a lack of the emotion empthy. From what I gather, this is feeling others joy etc. I do not feel this. Apart from death, but every body feels the loss of another being/creture/lifeform. In several of my earilier posts, those of you with good memoriries wiil have noticied that I did not have the problem with putting my self in someones shoes. Me being me, I littrelly thought of putting myself in someones shoes. Not empthy.

Unlike those with autism, people with AS are not usually withdrawn around others; they approach others, even if awkwardly. For example, a person with AS may engage in a one-sided, long-winded speech about a favorite topic, while misunderstanding or not recognizing the listener's feelings or reactions, such as a need for privacy or haste to leave. This social awkwardness has been called "active but odd". This failure to react appropriately to social interaction may appear as disregard for other people's feelings, and may come across as insensitive. Hwever, not all individuals with AS will approach others. Some of them may even display selective mutism, speaking not at all to most people and excessively to specific people. Some may choose to talk only to people they like.[21]

When I have a convesation, say on bushcraft, or genrally anyything I always to to end up talking about it from my perspective, not from others. I also talk a lot. Once when I was with my Grandad we were haveing dinner in a rastarunt.I was giving a wondeful lecture of the pyrimids and anchient egyptian culture in general. I looked round and rearlised that eever body was qiuet. My grandma apologized but one of the people near the table near us asked me to go on becuase it was intresting. :D . I aslways get made to feel that talkiing a lot it is a a bad thing, but it s after all one of my primary forms of comunication. Atthat time I supose my specialist subject was anchient egypt, konow I would say it was laungages, a few years ago computer games, or tactical education..! I also have a very limited imagination and am afriad of the dark because it takes away my surroundingds.

The cognitive ability of children with AS often allows them to articulate social norms in a laboratory context,[1] where they may be able to show a theoretical understanding of other people's emotions; however, they typically have difficulty acting on this knowledge in fluid, real-life situations.[5] People with AS may analyze and distill their observation of social interaction into rigid behavioral guidelines, and apply these rules in awkward ways, such as forced eye contact, resulting in a demeanor that appears rigid or socially naive. Childhood desire for companionship can become numbed through a history of failed social encounters.[1]

I mself do not feel the need to meet and talk to other people, I do try to use the social tools to comunicatrte better with those whom I have an intrest talking to. Astrophyyasists for example. I do tend to observe social situations from a third person point of view. Haveing used I's and also a lo t know I will use a diffrent scentence begining...And!!

The hypothesis that individuals with AS are predisposed to violent or criminal behavior has been investigated but is not supported by data.[1][22] More evidence suggests children with AS are victims rather than victimizers.[23] A 2008 review found that an overwhelming number of reported violent criminals with AS had coexisting psychiatric disorders such as schizoaffective disorder.[24]

[edit] Restricted and repetitive interests and behavior
People with Asperger syndrome often display behavior, interests, and activities that are restricted and repetitive and are sometimes abnormally intense or focused. They may stick to inflexible routines, move in stereotyped and repetitive ways, or preoccupy themselves with parts of objects.[19]

Pursuit of specific and narrow areas of interest is one of the most striking features of AS.[1] Individuals with AS may collect volumes of detailed information on a relatively narrow topic such as weather data or star names, without necessarily having genuine understanding of the broader topic.[1][5] For example, a child might memorize camera model numbers while caring little about photography.[1] This behavior is usually apparent by grade school, typically age 5 or 6 in the United States.[1] Although these special interests may change from time to time, they typically become more unusual and narrowly focused, and often dominate social interaction so much that the entire family may become immersed. Because narrow topics often capture the interest of children, this symptom may go unrecognized.[5]
I have very repetitive behaviours and routines, I apologize for any mus typeing but the keyboard is playig up. I for example, will always get up at six or earlier, go down stars every day, have breakfast and watch or read about the news. That is of course unless I listened to the news today on radio four, wich is a very good ptrogram. I also do not like change in my surroundings, we went on holiday recently and it was horrible. I hate mess as well because I just cannot cope with it. . I also have the habit of Ifi I am collecting something, say a sewries of books then I must get all of them lined up in a nuce straight line, even if my brother owns the book.

Stereotyped and repetitive motor behaviors are a core part of the diagnosis of AS and other ASDs.[25] They include hand movements such as flapping or twisting, and complex whole-body movements.[19] These are typically repeated in longer bursts and look more voluntary or ritualistic than tics, which are usually faster, less rhythmical and less often symmetrical.[26]

[edit] Speech and language
Although individuals with Asperger syndrome acquire language skills without significant general delay and their speech typically lacks significant abnormalities, language acquisition and use is often atypical.[5] Abnormalities include verbosity, abrupt transitions, literal interpretations and miscomprehension of nuance, use of metaphor meaningful only to the speaker, auditory perception deficits, unusually pedantic, formal or idiosyncratic speech, and oddities in loudness, pitch, intonation, prosody, and rhythm.[1]

Three aspects of communication patterns are of clinical interest: poor prosody, tangential and circumstantial speech, and marked verbosity. Although inflection and intonation may be less rigid or monotonic than in autism, people with AS often have a limited range of intonation: speech may be unusually fast, jerky or loud. Speech may convey a sense of incoherence; the conversational style often includes monologues about topics that bore the listener, fails to provide context for comments, or fails to suppress internal thoughts. Individuals with AS may fail to monitor whether the listener is interested or engaged in the conversation. The speaker's conclusion or point may never be made, and attempts by the listener to elaborate on the speech's content or logic, or to shift to related topics, are often unsuccessful.[5]
I speak slowly and in a monotone. And most of the makeing sens of speeches for example, is qiute hard.
Children with AS may have an unusually sophisticated vocabulary at a young age and have been colloquially called "little professors", but have difficulty understanding figurative language and tend to use language literally.[1] Children with AS appear to have particular weaknesses in areas of nonliteral language that include humor, irony, and teasing. Although individuals with AS usually understand the cognitive basis of humor they seem to lack understanding of the intent of humor to share enjoyment with others.[12] Despite strong evidence of impaired humor appreciation, anecdotal reports of humor in individuals with AS seem to challenge some psychological theories of AS and autism.[27]

[edit] Other
Individuals with Asperger syndrome may have signs or symptoms that are independent of the diagnosis, but can affect the individual or the family.[28] These include differences in perception and problems with motor skills, sleep, and emotions.

Individuals with AS often have excellent auditory and visual perception.[29] Children with ASD often demonstrate enhanced perception of small changes in patterns such as arrangements of objects or well-known images; typically this is domain-specific and involves processing of fine-grained features.[30] Conversely, compared to individuals with high-functioning autism, individuals with AS have deficits in some tasks involving visual-spatial perception, auditory perception, or visual memory.[1] Many accounts of individuals with AS and ASD report other unusual sensory and perceptual skills and experiences. They may be unusually sensitive or insensitive to sound, light, and other stimuli;[31] these sensory responses are found in other developmental disorders and are not specific to AS or to ASD. There is little support for increased fight-or-flight response or failure of habituation in autism; there is more evidence of decreased responsiveness to sensory stimuli, although several studies show no differences.[32]

Hans Asperger's initial accounts[1] and other diagnostic schemes[33] include descriptions of physical clumsiness. Children with AS may be delayed in acquiring skills requiring motor dexterity, such as riding a bicycle or opening a jar, and may seem to move awkwardly or feel "uncomfortable in their own skin". They may be poorly coordinated, or have an odd or bouncy gait or posture, poor handwriting, or problems with visual-motor integration.[1][5] They may show problems with proprioception (sensation of body position) on measures of apraxia (motor planning disorder), balance, tandem gait, and finger-thumb apposition. There is no evidence that these motor skills problems differentiate AS from other high-functioning ASDs.[1]

Children with AS are more likely to have sleep problems, including difficulty in falling asleep, frequent nocturnal awakenings, and early morning awakenings.[34][35] AS is also associated with high levels of alexithymia, which is difficulty in identifying and describing one's emotions.[36] Although AS, lower sleep quality, and alexithymia are associated, their causal relationship is unclear.[35]

As with other forms of ASD, parents of children with AS have higher levels of stress.[37]

[edit] Causes
Further information: Causes of autism
Hans Asperger described common symptoms among his patients' family members, especially fathers, and research supports this observation and suggests a genetic contribution to Asperger syndrome. Although no specific gene has yet been identified, multiple factors are believed to play a role in the expression of autism, given the phenotypic variability seen in children with AS.[1][38] Evidence for a genetic link is the tendency for AS to run in families and an observed higher incidence of family members who have behavioral symptoms similar to AS but in a more limited form (for example, slight difficulties with social interaction, language, or reading).[7] Most research suggests that all autism spectrum disorders have shared genetic mechanisms, but AS may have a stronger genetic component than autism.[1] There is probably a common group of genes where particular alleles render an individual vulnerable to developing AS; if this is the case, the particular combination of alleles would determine the severity and symptoms for each individual with AS.[7]

A few ASD cases have been linked to exposure to teratogens (agents that cause birth defects) during the first eight weeks from conception. Although this does not exclude the possibility that ASD can be initiated or affected later, it is strong evidence that it arises very early in development.[39] Many environmental factors have been hypothesized to act after birth, but none has been confirmed by scientific investigation.[40]

[edit] Mechanism
Further information: Mechanism of autism
Asperger syndrome appears to result from developmental factors that affect many or all functional brain systems, as opposed to localized effects.[41] Although the specific underpinnings of AS or factors that distinguish it from other ASDs are unknown, and no clear pathology common to individuals with AS has emerged,[1] it is still possible that AS's mechanism is separate from other ASD.[42] Neuroanatomical studies and the associations with teratogens strongly suggest that the mechanism includes alteration of brain development soon after conception.[39] Abnormal migration of embryonic cells during fetal development may affect the final structure and connectivity of the brain, resulting in alterations in the neural circuits that control thought and behavior.[43] Several theories of mechanism are available; none is likely to provide a complete explanation.[44]


Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides some evidence for both underconnectivity and mirror neuron theories.[45][46]The underconnectivity theory hypothesizes underfunctioning high-level neural connections and synchronization, along with an excess of low-level processes.[45] It maps well to general-processing theories such as weak central coherence theory, which hypothesizes that a limited ability to see the big picture underlies the central disturbance in ASD.[47] A related theory—enhanced perceptual functioning—focuses more on the superiority of locally oriented and perceptual operations in autistic individuals.[48]

The mirror neuron system (MNS) theory hypothesizes that alterations to the development of the MNS interfere with imitation and lead to Asperger's core feature of social impairment.[46][49] For example, one study found that activation is delayed in the core circuit for imitation in individuals with AS.[50] This theory maps well to social cognition theories like the theory of mind, which hypothesizes that autistic behavior arises from impairments in ascribing mental states to oneself and others,[51] or hyper-systemizing, which hypothesizes that autistic individuals can systematize internal operation to handle internal events but are less effective at empathizing by handling events generated by other agents.[52]

Other possible mechanisms include serotonin dysfunction[53] and cerebellar dysfunction.[54]

[edit] Screening
Parents of children with Asperger syndrome can typically trace differences in their children's development to as early as 30 months of age.[38] Developmental screening during a routine check-up by a general practitioner or pediatrician may identify signs that warrant further investigation.[1][7] The diagnosis of AS is complicated by the use of several different screening instruments,[7][33] including the Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale (ASDS), Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ), Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test (CAST), Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale (GADS), Krug Asperger's Disorder Index (KADI),[55] and the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ; with versions for children,[56] adolescents[57] and adults[58]). None have been shown to reliably differentiate between AS and other ASDs.[1]

[edit] Diagnosis
Main article: Diagnosis of Asperger syndrome
Standard diagnostic criteria require impairment in social interaction and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, activities and interests, without significant delay in language or cognitive development. Unlike the international standard,[9] U.S. criteria also require significant impairment in day-to-day functioning.[19] Other sets of diagnostic criteria have been proposed by Szatmari et al.[59] and by Gillberg and Gillberg.[60]

Diagnosis is most commonly made between the ages of four and eleven.[1] A comprehensive assessment involves a multidisciplinary team[2][7][61] that observes across multiple settings,[1] and includes neurological and genetic assessment as well as tests for cognition, psychomotor function, verbal and nonverbal strengths and weaknesses, style of learning, and skills for independent living.[7] The current "gold standard" in diagnosing ASDs combines clinical judgment with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R)—a semistructured parent interview—and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS)—a conversation and play-based interview with the child.[4] Delayed or mistaken diagnosis can be traumatic for individuals and families; for example, misdiagnosis can lead to medications that worsen behavior.[61][62] Many children with AS are initially misdiagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).[1] Diagnosing adults is more challenging, as standard diagnostic criteria are designed for children and the expression of AS changes with age;[63] adult diagnosis requires painstaking clinical examination and thorough medical history gained from both the individual and other people who know the person, focusing on childhood behavior.[64] Conditions that must be considered in a differential diagnosis include other ASDs, the schizophrenia spectrum, ADHD, obsessive compulsive disorder, major depressive disorder, semantic pragmatic disorder, nonverbal learning disorder,[61] Tourette syndrome,[26] stereotypic movement disorder and bipolar disorder.[38]

Underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis are problems in marginal cases. The cost and difficulty of screening and assessment can delay diagnosis. Conversely, the increasing popularity of drug treatment options and the expansion of benefits has motivated providers to overdiagnose ASD.[65] There are indications AS has been diagnosed more frequently in recent years, partly as a residual diagnosis for children of normal intelligence who do not have autism but have social difficulties.[66] In 2006, it was reported to be the fastest-growing psychiatric diagnosis in Silicon Valley children; also, there is a predilection for adults to self-diagnose it.[67] There are questions about the external validity of the AS diagnosis. That is, it is unclear whether there is a practical benefit in distinguishing AS from HFA and from PDD-NOS;[66] the same child can receive different diagnoses depending on the screening tool.[7] The debate about distinguishing AS from HFA is partly due to a tautological dilemma where disorders are defined based on severity of impairment, so that studies that appear to confirm differences based on severity are to be expected.[68]

[edit] Management
Last edited by James Brimer on Sat Aug 14, 2010 10:59 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Fri Jul 09, 2010 1:11 pm

You could ask your GP to refer you to a specialist.
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Fri Jul 09, 2010 3:31 pm

I could, it is just asking mum which is the problem.....any idea's on that???
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:09 pm

Why don't you want to ask your mum?
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby Rosie-posie » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:27 pm

Remember that people with dyspraxia often can have an over lap with aspergers without having a diagnosis of asd. Maybe show your mum this post?
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Wed Jul 14, 2010 5:15 am

Its hard tslking to anybody for me, but talking to parents is a lot harder. I do remember that people with Dyspraxia have a lot of aAutistic traits but I do fit every symptom and (no offence) from what I have hear a, not as clumsy as ,ost of you.

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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby evilmuffet » Wed Jul 14, 2010 5:43 pm

I'm obsessed with walking back and forth in my room listening to music. (I'd dance if I didn't trip over stuff! Please don't mock my strange oddities) I do remember I was very determined to get people to play unusual games when I was little too, used to be obsessed with animals anybody showed interested in to mix in with them. I guess you could say there was a time I wanted to blend in with others despite being awkward. But everyone liked making scoobies and doing handstands so it was a doomed playground for me. I even tried to get attention by inventing a silly game of making a house for a hedgehog with the cut grass which my little sister says they still do in school to this day. (I'm proud! lmao)
Dyspraxia must be like siblings to autism and aspergers since they're commonly linked together. we're so full of repetitive ways aren't we? Not that it's a bad thing since I know history like the back of my hand from it.
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:41 am

As I am writing this I have got the courage to send an e-mail to my grandma to ring mum about it. The main reason for me seeking this assesment is that it would make a lot more sense to me. Of course I a probably wrong but I think the theroy at least is sound. It would also set my mind at rest. The SID and Dyspraxics trait and the AS traits seem to fit the AS critiera rather well. though this is all rather counfuseing :? . It would also make sense of the really bad social skills.

Still I will see what happens next.


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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Mon Aug 02, 2010 10:25 am

Recently I orded another book by Luke Jackson (great aourther). I was all about the GF/CF free diet. I purchased it for an intresting read. When i gave dad the list of books I wished him to bye he read them out to valiadate what we had written was correct. Whn dad read out "A user Giude to the GF/CF fiet for Autism, ADHD and Aspergers Syndrome" mum asked if I knew what it meant. I did (I have been researching it latley). She said she had thought about implimenting it beefore. So therefore if the diet is speccofofcly for those with Autism, ADHD and AS then I must have one of the three. The first two easily being negated from the eqation leaves only one awnser. AS. So therefore I have AS. Of course this could be fault logic. Still.
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby parnassus » Tue Aug 03, 2010 8:54 pm

The logic is a bit faulty, as these are spectrum conditions and they blur into one another (and into other conditions, such as dyslexia, dyspraxia, Fragile X Syndrome, Rett's Syndrome...). It is possible to have traits of all the conditions but a diagnosis of none, and still benefit from such a diet.

In my life I have been diagnosed with dyspraxia, dyscalculia, non-verbal learning difficulties, Asperger's Syndrome, and hyperlexia. They are all different words for my particular collection of symptoms - I don't actually have five separate and easily distinguishable conditions. Now my primary diagnoses are dyspraxia and AS, and these are the ones I use when I talk about myself because they make the most sense to me. But the symptoms really are so fluid that I can't look at the list and say, "Logically I must have X, or Y, or Z." All the descriptions apply, and they all have their limitations. Does that make sense?
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Wed Aug 04, 2010 3:50 pm

Yes this does make sense.
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Re: Aspergers Mumbleing.. (probably spelt that wrong)

Postby James Brimer » Wed Aug 04, 2010 3:50 pm

Back to sqaure one, so to speak.
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