Things That Dyspraxics Are Above Average At

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:18 pm

I was at college levels for math when I was 15, so I guess I'm OK at it; of course, it's not my greatest strength, either.
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Postby Misanthropist » Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:18 pm

Ugh, that was me. Blah.
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Postby k9ruby » Thu Jul 01, 2004 3:49 pm

I HATE MATHS!

-Someone PLEASE tell me WHY algebra was invented
-Some please TELL me WHO invented formala so I CAN GIVE THEM A PIECE OF MY MIND!
-Why 99% of maths teachers are total weirdos!

(THESE R MY OWN OPINIONS!)
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Postby Charlotte » Sat Jul 03, 2004 6:17 pm

Misanthropist:
I was at college levels for math when I was 15, so I guess I'm OK at it; of course, it's not my greatest strength, either.


At college level aged only fifteen? That's brilliant! If maths isn't your greatest strength you must be very gifted in other areas.

Ruby:
I HATE MATHS!

-Someone PLEASE tell me WHY algebra was invented
-Some please TELL me WHO invented formala so I CAN GIVE THEM A PIECE OF MY MIND!
-Why 99% of maths teachers are total weirdos!

(THESE R MY OWN OPINIONS!)


They're my opinions too! Except for I prefer algebra to angles and shapes. Of course some maths is useful in the real world like adding and maybe being able to interept data but algebra I don't see as being particulary useful unless you're going into a career that specifically involves that and then you're going to be good at it anyway!
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Postby Kermit » Mon Jul 05, 2004 12:44 pm

My son is 10 years old this year and he is such a respectful and caring boy. He has many friends at school and I believe children with this condition learn to accept and value all people for who they are. He also can remember vividly things he did when he was only 2 which I always thought amazing. He is extremely artisitic and is one of only 2 boys in the school choir. He has a wonderful imagination and loves learning and reading about trains, Egyptian mummies, outer space, dinosaurs and crocodiles. He is a real environmentalist! I am very proud of him.
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Postby k9ruby » Tue Jul 06, 2004 3:51 pm

oh, yeah i was @ Year 10+ level in art in year 7! AND one of my collages made it into the schools portfolio! WICKED!
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Postby Vicky » Tue Jul 06, 2004 7:23 pm

I'm surprised to see maths listed as a dyspraxic talent. I think it must be a gift only shared by a few - most dyspraxics seem to have a terrible time with maths because of the sequencing skills, spatial awareness, and abstract thought involved. 'Reversal and omission of numbers' is a symptom listed by the Dyspraxia Foundation, and I have personal experience of this - I can't seem to write out a phone number without scrambling the digits!

Verbal ability seems to be our main strong point. A great many authors, now dead, may well have been dyspraxic. G.K. Chesterton, author of 'Father Brown Stories', was famous for his forgetfulness (he once sent a telegram to his wife: "Am at Market Highbury. Where ought I to be?") he was described as 'slow and awkward' by his teachers, and seemed to be a loner. One teacher once said of him, "This boy has a possible career either as an idiot or a genius." Given that he wrote several bestsellers, he obviously fulfilled the second half of that prediction...

Emily Bronte also displayed many dyspraxic symptoms. Helen Burns, a character in Charlotte Bronte's 'Jane Eyre', is clearly dyspraxic and Charlotte reported that she had modelled Helen on her sisters Maria and Emily.

Just a little history to support the gift of dyspraxia. :)
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Postby Misanthropist » Fri Jul 09, 2004 8:19 am

Personally, I find the smiliarities between dyspraxia and aspergers interesting. Of course, I'm sure you're all aware of the brilliant minds with the disorder.

Anyone care to expound on this, since the current topic is pretty much dead?
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Postby Charlotte » Fri Jul 09, 2004 11:45 am

Yes, I find the similarities interesting too. Have you ever read 'The Curious incident of the Dog in the Night Time'? I am crazy about that book and must have mentioned it to people about 3 million times!!! A few of the things Christopher did I could really emphasise with because I do them myself.

There are similarities between Aspergers Syndrome and dyspraxia and they can co-exist in the same person.
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Postby MIKE9899 » Fri Jul 09, 2004 7:18 pm

hi ppl i only found out about this site coz my dad told me.
its good to kno that ppl do go through wot i go through or worse.
but im above average at reading, and im not sure about anything else.
i only started today so i dont kno my away around :blink:
so i might need a bit of help :P
Life is a lot harder without support from friends and loved ones. never forget that
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Postby Jen » Fri Jul 09, 2004 9:48 pm

Hi Mike, i'm new too so you're not alone.
I also have an above average reading ability and am an excellent speller. My teacher told my mum when i was 9 that i had the reading ability of a 14/15 year old! I love reading books but my imagination is terrible, i'll never be an author :-)

I'm also pretty good at science, i love to know how things work.
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Postby Jen » Fri Jul 09, 2004 9:59 pm

I forgot to say, my long term memory is excellent as well. I remember an incident when i was extremely young, not sure how old i was but i was in a pushchair at the time (althouh i may have been older than your average child in a pushchair as my mum tells me i was very late in learning to walk!).

Anyway, my mum was pushing me along in a pushchair one day and i saw a woman get knocked over by a car (apparently she was ok). Then when i was about 14 we had to write a story at school about our earliest memory. I could vaguely remember this incident but wasn't sure how old i was so i asked my mum. My mum was astonished because she had totally forgotton about it. I described a lot of stuff to her and she said it was all true! Also i quite often bring up trivial stuff that happened when i was little that my mum can't believe i remember.
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Postby MIKE9899 » Fri Jul 09, 2004 10:53 pm

i get that aswell in 2002 i was watching star wars episode 1 at my dads friends house and i remembered most of the film and the last time i watched it before that was in 1998 when it was in the cinema! so i think i might have a photographic memory :unsure:
in addition to what you said in your first post in this thread i had the reading level of 16 year old at 8. Plus i had a preety good vocabulary
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Postby WARTORIOUS » Mon Jul 12, 2004 6:08 pm

Vicky wrote:I'm surprised to see maths listed as a dyspraxic talent. I think it must be a gift only shared by a few - most dyspraxics seem to have a terrible time with maths because of the sequencing skills, spatial awareness, and abstract thought involved. 'Reversal and omission of numbers' is a symptom listed by the Dyspraxia Foundation, and I have personal experience of this - I can't seem to write out a phone number without scrambling the digits!

Verbal ability seems to be our main strong point. A great many authors, now dead, may well have been dyspraxic. G.K. Chesterton, author of 'Father Brown Stories', was famous for his forgetfulness (he once sent a telegram to his wife: "Am at Market Highbury. Where ought I to be?") he was described as 'slow and awkward' by his teachers, and seemed to be a loner. One teacher once said of him, "This boy has a possible career either as an idiot or a genius." Given that he wrote several bestsellers, he obviously fulfilled the second half of that prediction...

Emily Bronte also displayed many dyspraxic symptoms. Helen Burns, a character in Charlotte Bronte's 'Jane Eyre', is clearly dyspraxic and Charlotte reported that she had modelled Helen on her sisters Maria and Emily.

Just a little history to support the gift of dyspraxia. :)

This post really surprised me, I would say that English was my worst subject. I hated maths but did great at it, I love the fact it’s so logical, and the fact it was challenging, most other subjects weren’t. In maths repeating the same things over and over I found pointless and extremely tedious, I just remember facts and equations like a duck to old KFC. :P

I would have said that Science would be the subject im best at, even from a very early age. I know many of the famous scientists are dyspraxic. I can't quote many of there names because im not sure who is or isn’t, but I know Einstein was.
Am I alone in thinking this? :rolleyes:
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Postby Jen » Tue Jul 13, 2004 5:33 pm

Wartorious, i agree with you there. Science is probably my best subject overall, it was also my favourite at school. I particularly liked Physics. I am now an Electonics Engineer :-)
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