How do you survive at school?

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

How do you survive at school?

Postby Reedlewis » Tue May 18, 2004 6:31 pm

I'm in year 10 and this week all the year 11's are leaving i can't wait till another year is up. I don't know how i'm going to survive these last 12 months.
Teachers are not helping me at school and know all i'm trying to do is to get througe the last 12 months.
I've found out that i was dyspraxic in December 2003. The school have known since March 2004
How do you survie at school?
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Postby Charlotte » Tue May 18, 2004 7:41 pm

Hi, I am sixteen and also have dyspraxia. I left school last year. My senior school were, on the whole, supportive of my dyspraxia but all the same my last three years at school were very difficult. I completely identify in all that you are saying as, this time two years ago, I felt exactly the same.

It's hard to describe to people who have happy school days what school is like for those who's school days aren't just unhappy, they are virtually impossible. I couldn't wait to 'get out', 'escape' from school. At my worst, I complained school to a prison and myself to soemone who is wrongly accused. I am forced there against my will, made to do things I don't like, feeling mad and like I'm going out of my mind. The only difference was I left the 'prison' and returned home every day only to go back the next.

Despite not liking school I worked really hard that last year. It is a very hard year and at times I was going out of my mind with stress and worry and fear and depression but I still kept working hard and that's all I can advice you to do too. You really haven't got long now, just work hard and do your best. Concentrate on your future. I am at college now and a lot happier. What do you think you'll do after year eleven?

I speak as a 'survivor' of unhappy schooldays. I can't believe a year ago I was still forced to go to school. I have grown so much since leaving. I hope this has helped you.

Charlotte
x x x x x
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Sorry this is so long,

Postby Hannah » Thu Jul 15, 2004 4:09 pm

Hi L Reed, I guess the L stands for Lewis? I like that name, it reminds me of the Trumpeter Swan- Lewis By E.F.White I think... I'm not sure. That Lewis had a disability too, he couldn't talk, the was mute but figured out a way to get round it and ended up with adventure riches and the love of his life along the way.

I remember year 11, I came into that year with such dread, but found myself surprised at how much pupils had matured. You see at this satge, when GCSE exams are imminant, all everyone wants to do is get good grades, no-one has time to be mean or annoy anyone else, because getting along is so much easier when there are more important things on the line. I still had trouble with some particularly determined people in that year who wanted to pick on me. But now I'm in sitxth form, and those people have either left to go to another college, or have been recognised for the horrible people they are.

Now I'm doing A-Levels, everyone makes an effort to be nice and get along, people are much more accommodating and now I have so many friends, far more than I have ever had before! Its strange this year, after leaving I realize I may not dread coming back to school, I may miss people there, and look forward to meeting them again. Something I've never felt before.

As for teachers, I'd ask them about recieving extra time in your exams, if I were you. I haven't had much other help from them myself throughout the year. But I've made active steps to help myself, such as buying cork board to pin reminders on to organise me, and keeping a homework diary. When I had disorganised notes, I'd spend a night sorting them in a file with dividers, and for revision I'd write bright notes and buy revision guides.

Don't worry about next year Lewis, I know it sounds easier said than done, but you may be surprised at how things turn out. If you need some one to talk to or any advice, email me. My best freind is leaving for university this year so I know what you're going through.
If you have dyspraxia, don't let it stop you, its not a disability, its a challenge.
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Postby parnassus » Sun Jul 18, 2004 1:49 pm

Hello Lewis,

I am severely dyspraxic and I know how you feel. School life for me was extremely difficult up until fifth year (Year 11). Of all my school years, Years 7, 8, and 9 were the worst.

What is your biggest problem? Is it schoolwork or making friends? Handwriting? Maths? Getting extra time in exams? Please be as specific as you can, then we can all offer you our tips.

Something that helped me very much was to set goals for myself. I have always wanted to be a writer and to study English at a good university. These are the long-term aims. To help me achieve these, I listed lots of short-term aims, and then wrote down what I needed to do to succeed in those. Here is an example:

Main goal: Get into Cambridge University

Short term goals:

Pass all my GCSEs (I find maths and science extremely difficult, must do something about these two. I will take a tape recorder to class, so I can play back the lesson as often as I need to when I am revising.)

Improve my time management and organisation. I will colour code all my subjects and tape a copy of my timetable into the back of each exercise book, etc. I will also draw up a homework timetable each week.

You get the idea? Having something to focus on really helps. If you are devoting all your energy to achieving what you need then your difficulties start to pop like soap bubbles in the wind. Having goals improves your confidence too. Decide what you want and then go for it!

Are you planning to stay on for A-Levels? Even though they are meant to be more difficult, I actually find them easier - I have got rid of all the subjects that caused me problems, like maths and chemistry, and now I can just concentrate on what I like.

Good luck!

Vicky
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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