Do you get extra time for your exams?

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Do you get extra time in exams?

Yes
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86%
No
3
14%
 
Total votes : 22

Do you get extra time for your exams?

Postby Hannah » Thu Jul 15, 2004 3:32 pm

I'm getting extra time in my A level exams, I got it in my GCSE'S too. At first I thought it was cheating and I didn't deserve it, but no matter how hard I tried I could never finish on time, even on my best subjects. My RS teacher sugeested extra time and I reluctantly took it. I had to see a psycologist to see if I was eligable and my parents had to pay £100 for the tests, which they shouldn't have had to pay. Now I have extra time, I can actually finish my exams, I find it a life saver and it has dramatically improved my grades, especially in the subjects I do, which involve essays, time organisation and the carefull stucturing of agruments to a point. Do any of you get extra time in exams? What did you feel about it when you found out about it? :?:
If you have dyspraxia, don't let it stop you, its not a disability, its a challenge.
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Postby WARTORIOUS » Fri Jul 16, 2004 10:50 pm

I do get extra time, and in the Mock GCSE's I did I always used it. When it came to the real GCSE's I used it twice, (Both times for math’s) Ether I have got faster or the dru.. Revision i did has sped me up. :D

I did use to hate getting and special treatment because it hurt my pride when i was younger, But about 15 people get extra time anyway if they want it so im cool with it.
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Postby Charlotte » Sat Jul 17, 2004 6:31 pm

I got extra time in my exams too, from my year six SATs. It felt as bit weird at first, a bit like cheating but I got used to it and I really needed it. It wasn't helped by a few people saying I didn't need it. My brain takes longer to process information so I DID need it! They just didn't get it! Idiots!!!
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Postby medrich11 » Mon Mar 14, 2005 5:16 pm

I didn't get extra time in year 6 but i did last year. I don't need it for the thinking time but for the time it takes to write things down. I am also left handed. :evil:
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Postby madame_tigre » Tue Mar 15, 2005 5:48 pm

I never got extra time

I sometimes used to rush through exams to get it all finished in time which wasn't a good idea because usually that meant I'd get rubbish results but when it came to GCSEs I revised really hard and for essay subjects like English, we did quite a bit of practice at school and I practiced at home and I ended up being alright on the night :)
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Postby parnassus » Thu Mar 24, 2005 11:51 am

I'm glad you did well, madame_tigre, but I think your technique would only work for someone with very mild dyspraxia. Anyone with greater difficulties than that would never be able to cope. I am severely dyspraxic and used to habitually fail every test until I got my exam concessions. I am entitled to 50% extra time (though I rarely need all of it) use of a laptop, and supervised rest breaks.

I love my schoolwork and enjoy showing what I know in exams, though even with the concessions I find them uphill work. A lot of people seem to think that having so much extra time can guarantee anyone an A, when obviously it can't - only your knowledge can get you an A. It upsets me slightly when my achievements are belittled. ("Oh, she only gets high marks because she has that computer.") Nothing I say can make them understand. I know I seem very articulate on these forums, but that's only because I have all the time in the world to think out what I want to say. In real life my thoughts tend to get all scrambled, and then other people defeat me easily because I can't translate them into speech.
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Postby madame_tigre » Fri Mar 25, 2005 9:47 am

I think that how fast I get things through depends on the environment I'm in which shows that I'm really rather mild. I can get disrupted by noise so easily and that can put me off from reaching my full potential. So, I guess I can work in an exam hall because it's quiet, therefore I can concentrate on my work although I did need to do a lot of revision and palnning before the exams which was rather challenging because I'm not known for being organised!

My first job I had was in a cattery and my boss couldn't understand why it took me twice as long to clear out all the litter than all the other girls working there. I had friends who worked there and they couldn't figure out what took me so long. This was the wrong environment for me because no matter how hard I tried it was never good enough just because I couldn't do the work in record time and being bossed about didn't make things easier. Although I love cats cleaning out their litter was never my ideal way of spending a Saturday morning.
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Postby parnassus » Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:04 pm

I also have problems with concentration. I have hypersensitive ears, so the noise of people's pens scratching on their exam papers irritates me. So does the fluorescent lighting in the exam hall, as they all seem to flicker constantly. Luckily my attention difficulties have a flip side - hyperfocusing. If the exam questions are centred on one of my obsessions, such as a certain historical period or a novel or a poem, the exam hall sort of dissolves and I just vanish into my own world. It feels wonderful when that happens, but at the same time it can be inconvenient - I can't control the fascination and so don't understand when to stop working. I get angry with the invigilators if they try to take my paper away when I'm still deeply fascinated by the question!
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Postby medrich11 » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:53 pm

I like exams mainly because their quiet. When I enter an exam I often get things done much fasterthan normal because of the exams are normally short answer questions.The most annoying thing is the distraction. I can get sidetracked so easily that a small knock can have me thinking about earthquakes somehow.
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Postby Phil » Wed Mar 30, 2005 10:44 am

When I was doing my GCSE's at school I got extra time.

When I was in college doing my GNVQ ICT and GCSE Maths extra time I did not get the extra time
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Postby parnassus » Wed Mar 30, 2005 3:57 pm

Phil, that reminds me - I promised to check over your CV. Could you send it to me by e-mail? You can do it by clicking on my name in the Forum Memberlist or go through my Xanga site.
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extra time

Postby k9ruby » Fri Apr 01, 2005 4:02 pm

Hi all!

at the moment i think i get 25% extra time (although STILL don't finish it with that!!! ) and also use of a laptop (I am allowed to use it in my english and science tests but not maths because the one i use AT THE MOMENT is very limited (its a alphasmart!) but that should change i get my 'real' laptop!!
:P :P :P
WHAT R THE POINT OF SATs ANYWAY???????????
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Postby Ann Ony-Mous » Fri Apr 01, 2005 7:01 pm

I do not do serious exams yet but in practical subjects I am encouraged (but not forced) to do lunchtime sessions. Anyone is welcome to these lunchtime sessions but children who are obviously struggling in practical classes (such as D&T or IT) are particulary strongly advised to attend.

This may sound horrible to you but in technology there would be no other way I could even come close to finishing my projects. It is also a sacrifice of the teacher's time as well as mine. It means that I get to practise practical skills for a short time (about 25 mins) regularly as well as a long and harrowing double period of lesson time. (1 hr 10 mins) The teachers individually show me the required skills instead of in a class demonstration. This means they can watch over my work and explain what to do at the same time. It makes much more sense to me, especially as they can correct me when I am doing wrong.

Other class mates who have missed lessons or are having difficulty themselves or need to discuss homework come to catch up so I do not feel singled out but the room and atmosphere is still much less crowded (though are practical rooms and labs are thankgoodness, quite spacious) and I find it much easier to concentrate and learn.
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Postby parnassus » Sat Apr 02, 2005 11:28 am

I used to go to twice-weekly lunchtime sessions for maths. 'Maths clinics', they were called. In theory anyone could go but few people did. My dyslexic friend and I went religiously - there were always two teachers staffing the clinic, so we got lots of one-on-one tuition. It was so boring and difficult, but it really did help - we both passed maths GCSE, thank goodness!
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Postby madame_tigre » Sun Apr 03, 2005 2:33 pm

The 'maths clinic' sounds like a really good idea, I wish they had something similar when I was doing GCSES! Sure, it would be very boring taking up your lunch time to study maths but in the end it would be very helpful and could save you from doing it all again in the future! Maybe if I got lots of one-on-one tuition, I could have got a C as well.
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