Best dyspraxic fiction

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

Best dyspraxic fiction

Postby parnassus » Tue Jan 11, 2005 4:35 pm

Books Featuring Dyspraxic Characters

Stephen Harris in Trouble: A Dyspraxic Drama in Several Clumsy Acts by Tim Nichol

Stephen Harris is petrified by the very thought of the big move to secondary school that is looming ahead of him. He is too clumsy even to tie his own shoelaces, but his warm friendship with his dog and the arrival of a kind 'special teacher' mean that things might be getting better...

The Dream Master by Teresa Breslin

'C for Cy, C for Clumsy.' That is what the bullies at school say. Eleven-year-old Cy, who gloomily says of himself, "Everything gets mixed up. Nothing co-ordinates," hates handwriting and having to concentrate. But then he has a vivid dream about Ancient Egypt. A very vivid dream. A dream in which an Ancient Egyptian boy travels back with him to twenty-first century Britain. A dream that becomes reality.

With the help of his wise grandfather, his new five-thousand-year-old teenage friend Aten, and the grumpy but hilarious Dream Master himself, Cy might just be able to find a way to make the bullying stop...

(This is a brilliant book - it had me in stiches of laughter!)

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Who hasn't heard of this famous classic? But what many people don't know is that this novel contains someone who is quite possibly fiction's first dyspraxic. Read the story of Jane's time at Lowood School and see if you can guess who it is.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
User avatar
parnassus
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5924
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 8:10 pm
Location: Over here

Postby parnassus » Fri Jan 14, 2005 2:12 pm

...and if you read the book Talli's Secret you won't even have to guess about the character in Jane Eyre.

Talli survived the car crash that killed her mum and sister, so she is the lucky one. But her dyslexia and dyspraxia meaning that she is finding the situation at school even more difficult to cope with. Then she visits Hawarth Parsonage on a school trip, and realises that she may have friends in three very unique ladies who live on through their literary works. The Bronte sisters' handwriting and spelling is just like hers! When she meets a mysterious girl walking around the Parsonage, she may have found someone who can answer her questions about the Brontes: why did they never socialise with other people? Was it because they wouldn't, or because they couldn't? Why were they unable to write properly? What did it mean to have dyspraxia in the olden days?

www.tallissecret.com
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
User avatar
parnassus
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5924
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 8:10 pm
Location: Over here

Postby Hermionefan5 » Fri Apr 29, 2005 8:52 pm

I was petrified of Junior High when I started. I am going to have to read that book!! Now, I am in college. i made it through junior high (what they call the years that people want to forget here). 8)
Image is from "Gilmore Girls" Season 1
"You are the same as everyone else."--"Forrest Gump"
"I want you to go out there and skate for these people like I have seen you skate."--"The Cutting Edge"
User avatar
Hermionefan5
The Cat's Pajamas !!
 
Posts: 2367
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2005 2:51 pm
Location: The United States of America :)


Return to General Dyspraxia Chat

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests