Caged in Chaos by Victoria Biggs

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

Caged in Chaos by Victoria Biggs

Postby Helen » Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:54 pm

If you have visited this forum before then you may be aware of Vicky (Parnasus on here) and her book, Caged in Chaos. It is a wonderful resource for anyone who has dyspraxia or for those who live with someone who has dyspraxia. I would also urge anyone who works with children and young people to buy a copy today. It is a must have book.

Here are all the details you will need to order your copy today.

Caged in Chaos A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free
Victoria Biggs
Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 1843103478

Book shops will order a copy if they do not have any in stock. It is also available from Amazon here http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1843103478/qid%3D1110375778/202-2588687-6761469
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Postby parnassus » Thu Mar 10, 2005 7:20 pm

Thank you once more, Helen...you are like a one-woman publicity campaign! :D
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Postby Helen » Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:36 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:

You are very welcome!

I want as many people as possible to have the opportunity to read your book.
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Postby SomeT » Sat Mar 12, 2005 4:02 pm

I got my copy today, excellent book!
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Caged in Chaos

Postby towildhoney » Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:43 pm

:D :D :D
This book is an excelent read for anyone with Dyspraxia after having been lumped with dyslexics (no offence meant) for ages it was great to have someone adress the physical problems especialy social ones helped me stop thinking I was crazy a must read
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Postby parnassus » Wed Mar 16, 2005 2:48 pm

Thank you so much :)

It's nice to be appreciated.

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Postby Ann Ony-Mous » Sun Mar 27, 2005 12:48 pm

It was through Vicky Biggs's book that I came to this site! I found the advice extremely helpful and relevent and the writing style creative and lively. (I know I sound like and English teacher.)

I am also a keen writer (though I never have the organisation or focus to finish any of my works. My brain is too full of ideas and before I know it I'm sitting in my chair in front of the computer with my imagination whizzing off into outerspace at the speed of light. My parents call it 'being on another planet.')

I found your book inspiring; thankyou Vicky!
When the going gets tough...the tough get going.
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Postby parnassus » Sun Mar 27, 2005 1:09 pm

Thank you so much. :D I'm glad to know it helped. Out of all the reviews the book has had, the remarks from other dyspraxic people mean the most to me.

You're in good company here. Most of us love literature and creative writing - I have started to believe that a flair for language typically accompanies dyspraxia. Welcome to the parallel universe!
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby parnassus » Sun Mar 27, 2005 1:16 pm

I am also a keen writer (though I never have the organisation or focus to finish any of my works.)

How do you write? Do you try to start at the beginning and work sequentially through to the end? It sometimes helps to write each chapter as it comes to you, and lace them all together at the end. You don't have to be a slave to sequence.

However, it can help to draw up a detailed plan before you even start. I do this a lot with fiction - I research all my characters thoroughly and create a profile for each one of them, describing their physical features, their likes and dislikes, their histories...I even include information that has no bearing on the story. Then I make a precise map of the plot line. by the time I've finished the preparations, I feel as if I know all the characters intimately and can't help but continue the ride until the end.

Beginnings are the most difficult for me. I tend to fuss and nit-pick at the first chapter until all the juice has been sucked out of it. Hopefully I'll learn to use perfectionism to my advantage.
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Postby Ann Ony-Mous » Sun Mar 27, 2005 1:32 pm

My main problem is that just as I have splashed through the shallows and got into the 'deep water' of my plot, a totally bizarre and wonderful idea for a new story comes cartwheeling into my find and the old story dries out. Quite often my ideas just fizzle out anyway.

Thanks for the tips!
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Postby parnassus » Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:15 pm

Could you fuse multiple ideas to form one story? (That may sound like some kind of horrific transplat surgery, but in some cases it works wonderfully.)
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Postby Miss Terry » Wed Mar 30, 2005 2:29 pm

Lying diagonally in a parallel universe...hmm...that would be about right Vicky!

Although I had been previously diagnosed with the condition dyspraxia, there were many aspects of my own behaviour, (and the behaviour of others) that I could not understand. My bedroom is a World War III battleground and bomsite, a military testing ground, a nuclear waste tip and a frequent rampage site for a heard of destructive elephants (I wonder who they are?) all rolled into one. I also knew that I was a nightmare sent to try unhappy technology teachers (I single handedly broke a sewing machine), an unpopular partner for practical science and a positive menace zone in PE.

Until I read your book I did not realise however, that the awkwardness, loneliness and solitary behaviour were also linked to dyspraxia. I had no idea what I was doing wrong in social situations, which lead to phobias of phoning friends, large crowds and too many people trying to talk to me at once. I found your book was inspiring and helpful. I also enjoyed your bright, intriguing style and use of language.

I hope you write another book soon!
When the going gets tough...the tough get going!
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Postby parnassus » Wed Mar 30, 2005 3:44 pm

So do I. :)

A lot of people do not realise that dyspraxia can affect social skills. Perhaps the connection is due to an overlap with autism/Asperger's syndrome, perhaps it is down to lack of practice - have you noticed that nearly all young children make their first friends on roller skates or during hopscotch games? - or perhaps the reason is different for each person. Whatever the cause, be confident that the problem does get better over time!

Enjoy being different,
Vicky
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Postby Ann Ony-Mous » Fri Apr 01, 2005 7:44 pm

I am Miss Terry (read about my strange identity idea in another post where I have explained myself)

As a result of the friend making situation in young children that you described I did not have a proper friend until the age of 9. We were both fairly advanced readers and so we discussed books. Unfortunately the friendship only lasted two years because she lost her interest in books and turned to clothes and make-up instead age 11. I had other friends by then though.

I try hard not to feel jealous and out of it when I hear friends planning to meet up for a game of tennis, or go rollerblading at the leisure centre, or go skateboarding/cycling in the park (I can cycle but do not enjoy it and am not at all confident), or even plan to go on a sports camp together.

However I enjoy other activities with friends so I needn't worry.

I think that the reason why dyspraxic teens find it hard to socialise is that there are too many factors eg. when talking to one person consider: facial expression, gestures/body language, situation, other people's views/feelings, the particular person's likes/dislikes ect. ect. ect.

It's organisation and coordination rolled into one. No wonder many of us find it hard!
When the going gets tough...the tough get going.
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Postby Ann Ony-Mous » Fri Apr 01, 2005 7:47 pm

You also have to be aware of your own facial expression, tone of voice and bodily stance so that you do not unintentionally give the wrong message.

Another complication in socialising is there can sometimes be horrific consequences for getting it wrong!!!
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