Art Lessons

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

Art Lessons

Postby Tom » Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:42 am

Hi I'm a new person here. My name is Tom. I'am nearly 13 and I was wondering if you guys manage to complete an art lesson without knocking over a tub of wax, or ink or getting a stern look from the teacher. Every time I spill somthing the teacher makes up some nasty comment like, "What do you want to be when you are older? As long as you are not an artist or a designer you will be ok!" Do you get nasty comments like that? DO you have any advise or if it happens to you? :?:
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Postby parnassus » Wed Mar 23, 2005 10:35 am

If someone says something like that to you, treat it as a joke. Remember that dyspraxia is a very difficult handicap for most people to understand - your art teacher finds design work as easy as breathing, so he can't even begin to imagine how it feels when your body doesn't listen to your brain. He might even be trying to make the situation more comfortable by joking about it.

Tips for success in art

Drawing

Use triangular-grip pencils for drawing (available from the Dyspraxia Foundation shop, the Dyscovery Centre, and many ordinary stationers' outlets - try W.H. Smith's.)

Wear a sweatband or other thick cuff around your drawing wrist to stabilise your hand.

Lean on a sloping surface. This makes drawing and writing much easier. If you can't find a special sloping desk, an A4 ring binder file placed sideways on the table makes a good substitute.

Start drawing or painting at the top of the page, so you don't smudge the artwork that is lower down.

Sculpting

If you have pots of wax or papier-mache standing about, place them on a large square of sticky matting called Dycem. You can get this from a lot of DIY shops. The Dyscovery Centre also sells it online. (www.dyscovery.co.uk) It stops things from getting knocked over so easily.

Line everything up in the order that you will use them.

Keep pots, jars, etc. away from the edge of the table - organize your work environment before you even start! If you clean up as you go, this will stop you getting flustered - artwork becomes much harder if the area is cluttered up with used paintbrushes, etc.

I'll post more tips if I can think of them.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby Tom » Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:24 pm

Thanks a lot! 8) I'll keep those in mind and use them in my art lessons! [
[quote]
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Postby parnassus » Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:57 pm

Good luck!

I forgot to mention one other pointer. Type out pocket-sized lists of instructions to follow when doing specific tasks ("How to make papier-mache", for example) and get them laminated. If you muddle up instructions and end up doing everything backwards - I do this a lot - you could check the card. And if its pocket-sized, nobody will know that you do it.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby Tom » Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:37 pm

But will they not see you take it out?
"Love leads to greed, greed leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to sufferering, suffrering leads to the dark side"
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Postby parnassus » Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:18 pm

Perhaps, but they won't know what it is. And even if they do find out (one ignorant person once teased me about the prompt cards I use to wash myself in the mornings) it is easy to make them be quiet about it. Just say something like, "I have a recognised disability that means I get instructions muddled up in my head, but at least I'm intelligent enough to accept that and try to work out ways of getting round it. If you were in my position, I doubt whether you would be able to cope." It's possible to say this politely, and it usually makes people pause to think before they say anything again.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby Tom » Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:20 pm

Thanx, i'll do that and see what happens!
"Love leads to greed, greed leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to sufferering, suffrering leads to the dark side"
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