Musical instruments

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

Postby tujunga » Sun Aug 14, 2005 12:17 pm

_C_ wrote:
parnassus wrote:My dad did suggest the triangle...

:D


or the Xylophone! :lol:



it can be very like the piano if you have to play it with two hands!!
tujunga
Super Poster
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2005 2:22 pm
Location: Ireland

Postby headinacloud » Sun Aug 14, 2005 1:15 pm

nt
Last edited by headinacloud on Wed Mar 25, 2009 10:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
headinacloud
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 4:13 pm
Location: Australia

Postby parnassus » Sun Aug 14, 2005 2:59 pm

I tried to learn the recorder when I was about seven or eight. I was dreadful - my fingers kept stumbling. I always wanted to sit down to play (I can't keep my balance and mess about with my fingers at the same time) but I wasn't allowed. Perhaps I would have better luck now that I'm older, and have a couple of years of occupational therapy behind me.

Being tone-deaf is a hindrance, as well. I love music; it appeals to me greatly. I can appreciate it when other people play beautifully, but ten seconds after they finish the melody vanishes from my head and I can never remember it, perhaps as a result of my poor short-term memory. My educational psychologist suggested that my musical tone deafness is part of my dyspraxia, as I have the same difficulty picking up on tone of voice. But I have discovered a way of making music stick in my head - I translate it into words! I read Samuel Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner when I was listening to The Planets' Suite, and now all I have to do to recall the music is to mentally recite the poem. If I could make learning a musical instrument a verbal process, I think it would become easier for me.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
User avatar
parnassus
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5923
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 8:10 pm
Location: Over here

Postby headinacloud » Mon Aug 15, 2005 2:27 pm

nt
Last edited by headinacloud on Wed Mar 25, 2009 10:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
headinacloud
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 4:13 pm
Location: Australia

Postby parnassus » Mon Aug 15, 2005 3:30 pm

Would it help you learn music if the piece you were playing was a song with words (on the score, I mean)?


Probably not. I find it difficult to read the music and move my fingers at the same time - adding an extra task to the mix would just complicate things further. My translation technique only works if I have nothing to do except recite the poem. That brings the music flooding back - providing I've chosen an appropriate poem. I used The Rime of the Ancient Mariner for The Planets' Suite because the pair of them just seem to slot into each other perfectly.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
User avatar
parnassus
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5923
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 8:10 pm
Location: Over here

Postby SomeT » Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:37 pm

I cant play keyboard or piano either I just hit random keys then mix them together in cubase to make them make more sense, I have heard that 'qchord' is really good to play for people with learning difficulties or the older version 'omnichord' they are expensive though but are worth it I think if you have a passion for music. If anyone has anymore questions regarding music or anything e-mail me at: somet@gamebox.net
I have been doing sound engineering as a hobby now for a while so i've learnt quite a bit about music etc.
SomeT
Power Poster
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2004 10:45 pm

Previous

Return to General Dyspraxia Chat

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 2 guests