The Declaration of dyspraxia

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The Declaration of dyspraxia

Postby The_bad_handwritter » Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:04 pm

I'm not sure what lead me to post this here but in my senior government class we had to write a version of the declaration of independence declaring us free from something and so I created one I call the Declaration of Dyspraxia

We the Dyspraxic's of the world believe that we should have the right to use our muscles freely, no hindrances to slow us down. That whenever our muscles fail to listen it is our right to acquire new and better muscles to protect the safety of us Dyspraxic's. We shall use theese muscles with prudence and accordingly we shall be able to fit in better with the other people of the world.

Dyspraxia has forbidden us from proper use of muscles
It has affected our speech in an incontrollable way
It has cause many a person handwriting to be sloppy
It can make our eyesight shoddier than most causing us to wear glasses
It has refused to let us fit in completely with others
It has prevented us from experencing normal everyday activities others can do, like driving
It has brought down our self-confidence more times than we can count
It makes people think we are dim-witted or slow
It makes others pass judgements before they get to know us
It makes it diffcult to get through one day without feeling some form of insecurity

We therefore, the Dyspraxic's of the world assembled to appeal to Dyspraxia for freedom from this self-confidence reducing prison, that we are of right to be free from this hell-hole we live with everyday. That we are absolved from all ties to the Dyspraxic world and that all muscular connections between us ought to be totally over and done with. And for the support of the declaration we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our confidences and our muscles.
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Postby parnassus » Sat Aug 13, 2005 7:11 am

It's a good parody. And I'm happy to see a third member from the United States - most people with dyspraxia-like symptoms seem to be diagnosed with Non-Verbal Learning Disorder over there...

But I don't think dyspraxia is entirely a negative thing. For me, it is a cocktail of the bad and the brilliant. We have very original minds because of dyspraxia; I wouldn't forfeit mine for the sake of a driving licence, perfect handwriting, or both. Nor do I particularly want to be absolved from all ties to the dyspraxic world. There are some marvellous people on this forum. :D I would never leave.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Sat Aug 13, 2005 8:01 pm

Whoa, that's funny. It's very pessimistic though. My dyspraxia isn't severe, so maybe I'm not qualified to say this, but there *is* a positive side. As Vicky/parnassus says, it gives you an invaluably original mind.
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Postby monkey » Sun Aug 14, 2005 2:00 am

though Dyspraxia may have its positive areas, alot of the time that can be very hard to see.
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Postby parnassus » Sun Aug 14, 2005 8:41 am

Perhaps that's because you become so used to it that you don't know it's there. :wink:

I could tell you three extremely positive things that I've noticed about you and which are probably due to your dyspraxia. But I am going to sit on the secret until you've noticed them for yourself!
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Postby monkey » Sun Aug 14, 2005 9:32 am

to whom was that dirrected?
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Postby parnassus » Sun Aug 14, 2005 9:43 am

You, of course!
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Postby The_bad_handwritter » Sun Aug 14, 2005 8:23 pm

When I wrote this I didn't neccesarily mean for it to sound so pessamistic but I knew that given the chance most people wouldn't choose to have Dyspraxia. While there is good there is also bad and it's the bad the makes me wish I didn't have it but the good that makes me want to stay. After so long you get used to it but it's still not easy being the only one in elementary school who carries around a laptop and stuff. And yes it's good to meet another US person here too because yor right most dyspraxics in the US don't get classified as such.
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Postby parnassus » Sun Aug 14, 2005 9:08 pm

After so long you get used to it but it's still not easy being the only one in elementary school who carries around a laptop and stuff.


I wasn't diagnosed until I was fifteen, so I felt relieved to get a laptop. I used to have to fight back tears because I could never write fast enough and I used to be punished for not finishing assignments, or turning in 'sloppy' work. When I did receive the computer, with permission to use it in exams, a small but ignorant number of students accused me of cheating. That was difficult to cope with, but when it comes to a choice between passing my exams and trying to fit in, I will always take the exams. My response to those students was, "I have a recognised disability. I was diagnosed by a group of specialists who are a thousand times more knowledgeable than you are. If I can live with this, so can you."

They still didn't understand. Some people are dyspraxic, and others are plain ignorant, but that's not our fault.
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Postby monkey » Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:02 am

parnassus, now im curious. what exactly am i trying to notice?
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Postby The_bad_handwritter » Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:32 am

parnassus wrote:
After so long you get used to it but it's still not easy being the only one in elementary school who carries around a laptop and stuff.


I wasn't diagnosed until I was fifteen, so I felt relieved to get a laptop. I used to have to fight back tears because I could never write fast enough and I used to be punished for not finishing assignments, or turning in 'sloppy' work. When I did receive the computer, with permission to use it in exams, a small but ignorant number of students accused me of cheating. That was difficult to cope with, but when it comes to a choice between passing my exams and trying to fit in, I will always take the exams. My response to those students was, "I have a recognised disability. I was diagnosed by a group of specialists who are a thousand times more knowledgeable than you are. If I can live with this, so can you."

They still didn't understand. Some people are dyspraxic, and others are plain ignorant, but that's not our fault.

After I was born I was sent from specialist to specialist because my parents couldn't figure out what was wrong with me. Finally when I was about 3 my physical therapist told me about this new disability they were learning about called Dyspraxia and she thouhgt I might have it. After awhile I was offically diagnosed and was allowed the use of a typewriter (way back when laptops were brand new) and then a laptop. When I was in 5th grade I decided I should explain to these kids who had been around me since kindergarten why I used a laptop. With the help of my teacher and my mom I got in front of the class, shared what I knew and then let them ask me questions. One girl asked me if she could catch from me like somebody could catch a cold. I told her no an explained to her that it wasn't a diesase or anything but she wouldn't believe me and stayed as far away from as she could until I changed school districts. That hurt so bad seeing the fear in her eyes when we were near each other. I too got the how come she gets the laptop questions but I just ignored them. It worked most of the time and if they kept persisting I would say you show me your handwriting and I'll show you mine. It worked almost everytime.
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Postby monkey » Mon Aug 15, 2005 7:01 am

im glad to here that your parents first realised that there was something wrong and then the important part they did somehting about it. kids can be very curl, and its not good that this happened to you. congradulations in being brave enough to tell your class baout your difficultys.
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