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Handwriting

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2006 7:50 pm
by Bladen
It seems to be my only problem with coursework, it just wont get any neater and I hate writing slow, I end up finishing exams in the half amount of the given time. I feel comfortable writing but when I write for a long time it hurts alot.

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2006 8:55 pm
by parnassus
At sixteen you're probably too old for an occupational therapist's intervention to do any good. I use a computer for all my exams. Could you get the same concession?

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 10:38 am
by Thirteen-thirty-seven
Do you get extra time? You probably need quite a lot, as well as computer.

If you can't have a computer during exams, I suggest you get a specially adapted pen,. which is easier to hold.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 4:39 pm
by Bladen
I usually use those cheap ass pens from ASDA or something, yeah I do get extra time and sometimes with exam papers I have no choice but to write and it annoys me writing slowly and neatly, very very much.

I had OT before but it did no help to me at all, I had Speech therapy no help so me and my am decided to let myself get on myself and now I'm fine, I'm not so bad in basketball, a good defender and moderatly good striker in football, a good cricketsman and I know alot of words and use them in my vocabulary that half my family hardly know and my range of understanding has gotten better aswell as my hand eye coordination. My only problems are handwriting, heavy legs and heavy hands and disccordination at times.

Teachers have no right at all to slag off your writing, it cannot be helped and those so called smart arses need to know what Dyspraxia is and accept that people have it, it's not as if there is a perfect aryan race of children who get treated and taught properly and the kids who have a learning difficulty who get blasted and pissed off for no reason, higher authority my arse, the teachers these days can be right bitches and dicks.

Even with my difficulties I'm doing foundation GCSE in 8 subjects and aiming for 5 Cs, I have one overall grade back which was a C and I got no help. If I can change from what I was to what I am now in a space of 4 years then I can handle myself later in life with ease.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 5:00 pm
by parnassus
I use specially adapted pens for when I write at all - I type most things - and I think you should do the same. W.H. Smith's sell good dyspraxic-friendly pens that are moulded to fit the shape of your hand. The Dyscovery Centre also offers a pen that is specifically designed for people with co-ordinaiton disorders.

I'm sorry occupational therapy was of no help to you. My therapist was excellent - she taught me how to cook safely and did a lot of exercises with me that have greatly improved my movement skills. I never received speech therapy, as beyond a faint lisp I have no difficulty with enunciation, but some language therapy would have been useful - I don't get sarcasm and can have trouble deducing the hidden meanings in conversations.

It sounds like you have had a pretty rotten experience in education. As a severely dyspraxic person, I suffered before I was diagnosed - I used to get called lazy all the time. "She's very bright but she just doesn't try." That hurt so much. But I have forgiven my teachers for that - even the ones whom I can only describe as bullies - because some of them had probably never even heard of dyspraxia (awareness has only really taken off over the last few years) and we can't expect them to be all-knowing. They're human beings and they make mistakes. They're not all b*tches and d*cks - in fact, I'd say the majority of them really do care about us. I am grateful for the support I received during my GCSE and A-Level years; I wouldn't be where I am now without it.

I also consider myself to be very independent and determined. These are great qualities to have, but remember that absolutely everyone needs the support of other people at times, no matter whether they be teachers, family, friends, or therapists. Don't cut yourself off from all that and tell yourself that you can always 'go it alone'. You will end up hurting yourself if you think like that. It takes a lot of guts to face up to the difficulties of dyspraxia by yourself, but it takes even more to say, "I'm struggling. Help me." In fact, 'help me' is probably one of the hardest things to say - right behind 'I'm sorry'.

I'm nearly nineteen and I can tell you for a fact that life is not easy, especially if your dyspraxia is severe. But it's certainly colourful and interesting. I feel blessed.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 6:46 pm
by Andy
I really am very lucky in school I get extra time for all tests also a scribe and reader if I want. Also most of my teachers are really good about my messy writing and I type most work especially longer bits of work. In Geography if the teacher cant do my drawings for me he always organises a scribe usually a senior pupil. Ive never been criticised for my writing even in primary school! what used to really annoy me was when I would get stickers and things saying great work and all that cos I always Knew that my work didnt look as good as everyone elses, and I never wanted it up on the wall. I think thats when I was assesed for a lap top in primary 3. Now my work if processed looks as good as everyone elses. Ive got a really cool PDA now with a small foldaway keyboard so Its not heavy to carry around.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 6:57 pm
by cookie-monster
parnassus wrote:I use specially adapted pens for when I write at all - I type most things - and I think you should do the same. W.H. Smith's sell good dyspraxic-friendly pens that are moulded to fit the shape of your hand. The Dyscovery Centre also offers a pen that is specifically designed for people with co-ordinaiton disorders.

I'm sorry occupational therapy was of no help to you. My therapist was excellent - she taught me how to cook safely and did a lot of exercises with me that have greatly improved my movement skills. I never received speech therapy, as beyond a faint lisp I have no difficulty with enunciation, but some language therapy would have been useful - I don't get sarcasm and can have trouble deducing the hidden meanings in conversations.

It sounds like you have had a pretty rotten experience in education. As a severely dyspraxic person, I suffered before I was diagnosed - I used to get called lazy all the time. "She's very bright but she just doesn't try." That hurt so much. But I have forgiven my teachers for that - even the ones whom I can only describe as bullies - because some of them had probably never even heard of dyspraxia (awareness has only really taken off over the last few years) and we can't expect them to be all-knowing. They're human beings and they make mistakes. They're not all b*tches and d*cks - in fact, I'd say the majority of them really do care about us. I am grateful for the support I received during my GCSE and A-Level years; I wouldn't be where I am now without it.

I also consider myself to be very independent and determined. These are great qualities to have, but remember that absolutely everyone needs the support of other people at times, no matter whether they be teachers, family, friends, or therapists. Don't cut yourself off from all that and tell yourself that you can always 'go it alone'. You will end up hurting yourself if you think like that. It takes a lot of guts to face up to the difficulties of dyspraxia by yourself, but it takes even more to say, "I'm struggling. Help me." In fact, 'help me' is probably one of the hardest things to say - right behind 'I'm sorry'.

I'm nearly nineteen and I can tell you for a fact that life is not easy, especially if your dyspraxia is severe. But it's certainly colourful and interesting. I feel blessed.


What are the pens from smiths called? might get some

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 7:34 pm
by Bladen
I only suffer from Dyspraxia midly but the main problems with handwriting are my hands, they're quite large, the centre finger being 12CM with the index being 11CM. My education itself has only gotten into me since I was in yr 9, I've gotten most of my knowledge from personal research, I hardly go outside, I have a few friends, I just prefer staying inside speaking to my mates through MSN. Those big chunky pens end up getting stolen, I tried them once before. I've gotten quite far going through this alone and I'm happy to say I can keep going, doing whatever the hell I please, no one to patronize me, learning more complicated and cool stuff, that's basically me.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 7:48 pm
by parnassus
It is great to study by yourself and I don't want to disparage you for that. I taught myself two A-Level subjects and took them both a year early (I had the best result in the country for one of them). But don't underestimate other people and the things they can do to help you. Just because some teachers and classmates have been patronising towards you doesn't mean that they all will be.

Socialising is very hard for me, but I realise that I can perhaps help other people as much as they can help me - we've all got different skills to share and there's nothing shameful in trusting each other. It's difficult. It's dangerous. But it's worth it. It's as important to believe in others as it is to believe in yourself.

I'm sorry the pens got stolen. Some of them do come on strings that you can hang from your neck - I used to have one of these. The only problem was that the bullies would pull on it, and that wasn't fun.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 8:04 pm
by Bladen
Pockets are more fun because if anyone tried to pick pocket you stomp their feet! :D

:0

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 8:08 pm
by k9ruby
I type my work all the time now. In exams I have this and extra time (25%).

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 8:12 pm
by Bladen
In exams I always finish early for some reason, my writing isn't so bad at times and I do pretty well, I'm just impatient but that's just me not my dyspraxia.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 4:27 pm
by carrie
its really really hard for me too write neatly or even legibly with or without extra time and I think to fast for it to help most of the time but I am improving as im doing a little less though certain times it is still really hard and it is hard if your bright but just do your bests and teachers will just have to learn to cope. so meh!

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 4:45 pm
by Bladen
I had pretty bad pains at the end of my GCSE exams from all the writing, I got extra time though so no big deal.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:14 pm
by carrie
thats good bladen though the pain is awful had it after my history exam (1hour 40) and my hand was so sore it felt like my hand could fall off