Page 1 of 1

GCSE R.S HELP!

PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:56 pm
by kitty_cute
I would like anyone, who knows things about the Bible to help me on these topics.

The Parable on the Lost Son
The Parable of the Sower

What are the stories of the above, what is their message, AND HOW DO THEY AFFECT CHRISTIANS TODAY?

(my R.S on Luke and Acts is on FRIDAY!)

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:03 am
by parnassus
The Parable of the Prodigal Son

Jesus continued: "There was a man who had two sons. The younger one said to his father, 'Father, give me my share of the estate.' So he divided his property between them.

"Not long after that, the younger son got together all he had, set off for a distant country and there squandered his wealth in wild living. After he had spent everything, there was a severe famine in that whole country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to a citizen of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed pigs. He longed to fill his stomach with the pods that the pigs were eating, but no one gave him anything.

"When he came to his senses, he said, 'How many of my father's hired men have food to spare, and here I am starving to death! I will set out and go back to my father and say to him: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son; make me like one of your hired men.' So he got up and went to his father.

"But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him.

"The son said to him, 'Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.'

"But the father said to his servants, 'Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. Bring the fattened calf and kill it. Let's have a feast and celebrate. For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.' So they began to celebrate.

"Meanwhile, the older son was in the field. When he came near the house, he heard music and dancing. So he called one of the servants and asked him what was going on. 'Your brother has come,' he replied, 'and your father has killed the fattened calf because he has him back safe and sound.'

"The older brother became angry and refused to go in. So his father went out and pleaded with him. But he answered his father, 'Look! All these years I've been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends. 30But when this son of yours who has squandered your property with prostitutes comes home, you kill the fattened calf for him!'

"'My son,' the father said, 'you are always with me, and everything I have is yours. But we had to celebrate and be glad, because this brother of yours was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.' " - Luke 15:11-32


A parable is a metaphor, a story that is used by Jesus to make a point. In this parable, the father is God. The lost son stands in for you and me - for each individual person who has ever lived. Like the prodigal son, we all rebel against God. We seize His gifts and squander them on worthless and even dangerous things without so much as a thank you. But when things start to go badly wrong, we realise how wrong we were and decide - if we're brave enough to do it - to turn back to a Lord who must surely be very angry with us.

Only He is not angry. He is so pleased to see the face of his beloved child again that He gives a lavish party to welcome us home. God is unfair; He doesn't punish people as they deserve. If God were fair none of us would have a hope.

He is merciful. And for Christians today His mercy means exactly the same as it did for Christians yesterday - that no sin we can commit is big enough to separate us from the love of our Heavenly Father, providing we keep acknowledging that love and accepting its reality.

The Parable of the Sower

That same day Jesus went out of the house and sat by the lake. Such large crowds gathered around him that he got into a boat and sat in it, while all the people stood on the shore. Then he told them many things in parables, saying: "A farmer went out to sow his seed. As he was scattering the seed, some fell along the path, and the birds came and ate it up. Some fell on rocky places, where it did not have much soil. It sprang up quickly, because the soil was shallow. But when the sun came up, the plants were scorched, and they withered because they had no root. Other seed fell among thorns, which grew up and choked the plants. Still other seed fell on good soil, where it produced a crop—a hundred, sixty or thirty times what was sown. He who has ears, let him hear."

The disciples came to him and asked, "Why do you speak to the people in parables?"

He replied, "The knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them. Whoever has will be given more, and he will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what he has will be taken from him. This is why I speak to them in parables:

"Though seeing, they do not see; though hearing, they do not hear or understand. In them is fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah:
" 'You will be ever hearing but never understanding;
you will be ever seeing but never perceiving.
For this people's heart has become calloused;
they hardly hear with their ears,
and they have closed their eyes.
Otherwise they might see with their eyes,
hear with their ears,
understand with their hearts
and turn, and I would heal them.' But blessed are your eyes because they see, and your ears because they hear. For I tell you the truth, many prophets and righteous men longed to see what you see but did not see it, and to hear what you hear but did not hear it.

"Listen then to what the parable of the sower means: When anyone hears the message about the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what was sown in his heart. This is the seed sown along the path. The one who received the seed that fell on rocky places is the man who hears the word and at once receives it with joy. But since he has no root, he lasts only a short time. When trouble or persecution comes because of the word, he quickly falls away. The one who received the seed that fell among the thorns is the man who hears the word, but the worries of this life and the deceitfulness of wealth choke it, making it unfruitful. But the one who received the seed that fell on good soil is the man who hears the word and understands it. He produces a crop, yielding a hundred, sixty or thirty times what was sown."


Jesus Himself has clarified what the parable means in the last paragraph, so I won't re-describe it. It is, however, important for you to connect His words about the seed that falls upon good soil with another remark He made about seed in a different part of the Gospel: "I tell you the truth, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds." This is the paradox of Christianity - eternal life is achieved only through sacrifice, sacrifice that may or may not include physical death. For Christians today, this means that we must be prepared to cultivate our minds and hearts so that they will be 'good soil' in which the seed of the Gospel can grow. It also means that we must be prepared to do anything necessary to achieve this personal and spiritual growth. There can be no holding back.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:22 pm
by kitty_cute
Thanks Vicky! x

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:33 pm
by Dan
I'm not really very religious. :S But I know Jesus did stuff once, if that helps.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 1:13 am
by Page
parnassus wrote:
Jesus Himself has clarified what the parable means in the last paragraph, so I won't re-describe it. It is, however, important for you to connect His words about the seed that falls upon good soil with another remark He made about seed in a different part of the Gospel: "I tell you the truth, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds." This is the paradox of Christianity - eternal life is achieved only through sacrifice, sacrifice that may or may not include physical death. For Christians today, this means that we must be prepared to cultivate our minds and hearts so that they will be 'good soil' in which the seed of the Gospel can grow. It also means that we must be prepared to do anything necessary to achieve this personal and spiritual growth. There can be no holding back.


That's not it.

The hard ground is symbolic of people who hear the Word of God but do not receive it. The hardness of the ground is similar to the hardness of their heats.

The seeds that grow in the shallow soil and then wilt are symbolic of people that hear the Word, are enthusiatic at first, and then drop out when it gets difficult. If you are a Christian, life often gets harder because once you start to follow Christ, you become an enemy of the world by default.

The seeds that grow up among thorns are the people who hear the Word and attempt to grow but are choked and held back by the evil desires of their own flesh.

The seed that falls on good ground and grows is a symbol of those who hear the Word, and it produces a change in their lives and start producing as a result of this change.



This is the paradox of Christianity - eternal life is achieved only through sacrifice, sacrifice that may or may not include physical death.


This is something I must take issue with, as there is nothing in the Bible that states this. Rather, it is by Grace and God's mercy that we are saved.
Ephesians 2:8-9 states that, "For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.".

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 10:00 am
by Thirteen-thirty-seven
But we need to accept God's grace. We need to let God into our lives. This often necessitates scarifice of one kind or another.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 5:17 pm
by Page
Thirteen-thirty-seven wrote:But we need to accept God's grace. We need to let God into our lives. This often necessitates scarifice of one kind or another.


God does not require our permission to bring Himself into our lives. If that were the case, we would be more powerful than God. However, due to the fallen nature of our flesh, we are incapable of choosing God on our own. Rather, God chose to redeem us, even though it may appear to us that we chose Him:

Ephesians 1:4 just as He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we would be holy and blameless before Him. In love...

Ephesians 1:5 ...He predestined us to adoption as sons through Jesus Christ to Himself, according to the kind intention of His will,