State vs Private Education

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State vs Private Education

Postby Esioul » Mon Jan 09, 2006 5:43 pm

I would be interested to know other peoples veiws on this. Throughout my school education I struggled in a state school. I was very lucky to obtain a place for a summer school at a prestigious private school a few years ago, and it really showed me the differences between the type of education they get, and the sort I and my peers at state school got.
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Postby k9ruby » Wed Jan 11, 2006 4:36 pm

What sort of differences?
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Postby Joss1991 » Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:00 pm

i have never been to a state school instend i have been to private and ld.
I was worse enough in private so i proberly wouldnt be able to cope at a state.
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Postby Guest » Wed Jan 11, 2006 10:33 pm

I think you have to appreciate the varity of independent schools there are from traditional structeured to Steiner schools. There is also a degree of variation in the state sector there is aa phenominal gap between the best state schools and the worst. Saying this if I could posibly afford it I would not send my children to a state school having been to one myself.
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Postby david456 » Wed Jan 11, 2006 11:29 pm

I think alot is to do with the quality of the teaching to be honest. If you have a good teacher. You should be able to get a better grade. In a private school. You are supposed to be paying for that better teacher in the first place and a more individual one on one teaching. The classess are also smaller.

I've had brilliant teachers at a state school and one or two awful ones, but if you are determined to learn you and you do your best.

Some people are more academic than others anyway, so I guess private schooling wouldn't suit everyone. The fees don't automatically give you the A grades either the pupil still has to put the effort in. The private school just provides the extra one on one that a state school maybe can't in my opinion.
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Postby fuzzy » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:39 pm

I dont believe in private schooling because of the principle- everyone is equal; why should those with more money have a better education? Yet at the same time, with the state of some schools today, I can see why ppl would choose to privately educte thier kids.
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Postby david456 » Thu Jan 12, 2006 9:36 pm

What about the arguement, that if you've worked hard to earn your money why shouldn't you spent it how you see fit?
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Postby parnassus » Thu Jan 12, 2006 11:22 pm

That argument is vanquished by the fact that many people on low incomes - the so-called 'working class' - actually work much harder than rich people do, but they don't get the same reward for it. The man who spends six days a week emptying people's rubbish bins and getting paid a pittance is doing a much more vital job than a top model, yet it is the top model's children who will probably be getting the private education. A place in a private school shouldn't be seen as a reward for hard work, because quite often it isn't.

I was educated in private schools (international academies that followed a British programme of study) when I lived in Saudi Arabia because that was the only viable option. I could not have attended a local state school, because so much of the Saudi curriculum revolves round Islam, and - where girls are concerned - cooking and sewing. Furthermore, I didn't have the skills to study maths or science in a language that is not my own. It would have been educational suicide.

When I was forced to return to Britain, due to bullying, my parents chose a private school for three reasons. 1.) They believed (and, sadly, I think they had a point) that anti-bullying measures would be more stringent in a private school, 2.) they had the money to send me, and 3.) they needed a school with a boarding house attached. Not many state schools offer boarding facilities.

I am extremely grateful that I had the opportunity to study at that school, so I can't condemn private education in good conscience - much as I would like every child in the country to receive the same standard of education. Occasionally I tried to justify my time at Colditz with the thought, "Well, you've earned it. You've won two scholarships - it's not just about the fact that Mum and Dad can afford this place." But then I realised that I was part of a vicious circle: if all the scholarship students are inducted into the private system, and if all the best teachers defect from the state schools for the sake of higher wages, the state schools will never be in with a chance of proving themselves. Theoretically, Britain has a good education system - it just needs more backbone.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby david456 » Fri Jan 13, 2006 12:07 pm

Doesn't really defeat the arguement. If you are working six days a week to earn money with two jobs and that allows you to afford the nice things in life. What is wrong with that?

So called rich people wouldn't have started on a high wage, they would have had to have worked up to one. Models I'm sure have to work hard, fitness regimes, etc, maybe it's not the hardest job in the world, but you need some skills. Not as many as an actor I would have thought, but that isn't an easy job and it's all relative. People see a film because of the star in it and this affects their salary accordingly. They started off looking for work and on poor pay for extra roles. Everybody starts at the bottom of the ladder, but if you work hard to climb it and find yourself in a job with good money. If you're running a company of 100, are you working less hard than one of those one hundred employees? Have you worked in a top job and a low paid one to make the comparison that low paid workers work harder?
Out of interest what do you class as rich. £30,000 a year £50,000, £100,000? Equally what do you class as a low income?

Your last comment could be applied to the NHS as well.
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Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Fri Jan 13, 2006 2:47 pm

How rich you are doen't just depend on your salary, but on the number of people your salary has to support.

A person who lived alone and earned £30,000 per year would be richer than someone who earned £40,000 per year but had to support 10 children on it.

Even if we accept your argument that poor people are poor because they are lazy (which I certainly don't) is it fair that a child should go to a weaker achool as a punishment for his/her parents' laziness?
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Postby kitty_cute » Fri Jan 13, 2006 5:55 pm

I think it all depends on the teaching. I myself go to a Private School, and some of the teaching isnt as a high standard as it should be. But theres some good teachers. And this is in the same as state schools. Private schools are about better facilities and smaller classes, although I dont how that comes into it in our school ><
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Postby david456 » Fri Jan 13, 2006 7:03 pm

Your first point- Potentially, but doesn't follow, there are all sorts of tax credits and things you get for children. So salary alone I would agree with you on, maybe on income I wouldn't.
Having said that it's all about living to your means and spending on essentials. (going off on a tandgant now).

Who said that so called poor people are lazy?
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Postby kitty_cute » Fri Jan 13, 2006 8:14 pm

Whos point is this David? Sorry -_-; haha
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Postby david456 » Fri Jan 13, 2006 9:56 pm

Sorry Kitty I was refering to the post from Thirteen-thirty-seven. I didn't see you post, when I posted.
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Postby towildhoney » Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:29 pm

I think the lack of choice available within the state sector as to how your childs educated is a big plus for private education and the variety it offers. Many people for example belive that the academic emphasis for 4-7 year olds is totally wrong. Fuzzy I think you are wrong or at least unrealistic with the argument everyone is equal so we should not have private education. Everyone is very diffrent and unless everyone was sent to identical schools and parents were only say aloud to read with there children for 15mins a night and not help with homework there are so many ways that peoples circumstances differ it is neigh on imposible to achive equality. Why reject private schooling. Also the same type of education won't suite everyone. I think anyway that the choice parents have in state education leads to inequalities parents who can afford to move into the catchment areas for better schools. People pay or tutor there children themself to get them through entrance exams. I think people are perfectly within there right to pay for there childs education if they want to you won't convince many parents that there child should recive less educational opurtunities for a lofty principle. People in London are known to change religion /denomination to get there children into better persorming state dreligous schools.
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