Gifted, twice exceptionalities...

Feel free to debate any issues you wish here. Warning: The topics discussed and their content may on occassion offend some.

Gifted, twice exceptionalities...

Postby rita » Sun Feb 12, 2006 12:54 pm

parnassus wrote:There are four or five people on this forum who are members of NAGTY (National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth).(...)I am convinced that there are several people on this website who are eligible, but only you can decide that by looking at the entrance criteria and talking to your schools.



from:http://www.nagty.ac.uk/student_academy/joining_nagty/documents/eligibility_criteria_0506.pdf

Eligibility Criteria

Evidence submitted should be one of the following:

Test Evidence
Non-test Evidence
Cognitive Ability Tests – a score of 126 or
above in one battery or 120 or above in
two batteries.

MidYIS – a mean score of 126 or above.
Yellis – scores of 78% or above in Year 10
or of 86% or above in Year 11, or a
standardised score of 126 or above.
Key Stage 3 SATs – an examined Level 8
in Mathematics or a Level 8 teacher
assessment in another subject at the end
of Year 9.

UK Maths Challenge – Gold Award.

World Class Tests – Merit or Distinction.

GCSEs – a points score of 58 or above in
the best eight subjects
(where A* = 8, A = 7, B = 6 etc.). This
translates to 428 points on the new QCA
points system (where A*=58, A=52 etc).
Other standardised test of general ability,
e.g. other nferNelson test – a standardised
score of 126 or above.

US Scholastic Assessment Tests (SATs) –
outstanding performance when ageadjusted.[/quote]
rita
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 10:42 pm

second part

Postby Guest » Sun Feb 12, 2006 4:25 pm

Parnassus said:
There are four or five people on this forum who are members of NAGTY (National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth).(...)I am convinced that there are several people on this website who are eligible, but only you can decide that by looking at the entrance criteria



from:http://www.nagty.ac.uk/student_academy/joining_nagty/documents/eligibility_criteria_0506.pdf

Eligibility Criteria

Evidence submitted should be one of the following:

Test Evidence
Non-test Evidence
Cognitive Ability Tests – a score of 126 or
above in one battery or 120 or above in
two batteries.

MidYIS – a mean score of 126 or above.
Yellis – scores of 78% or above in Year 10
or of 86% or above in Year 11, or a
standardised score of 126 or above.
Key Stage 3 SATs – an examined Level 8
in Mathematics or a Level 8 teacher
assessment in another subject at the end
of Year 9.

UK Maths Challenge – Gold Award.

World Class Tests – Merit or Distinction.

GCSEs – a points score of 58 or above in
the best eight subjects
(where A* = 8, A = 7, B = 6 etc.). This
translates to 428 points on the new QCA
points system (where A*=58, A=52 etc).
Other standardised test of general ability,
e.g. other nferNelson test – a standardised
score of 126 or above.

US Scholastic Assessment Tests (SATs) –
outstanding performance when ageadjusted.[/quote]


I'm unsure whether or not this topic has been broached but I'll bring it up because ever since I recieved the results of my assessment I have hoped not to be the only one pondering such questions.

But first, I thought I should provide some backgrond so as to clarify from whence these questions originated.

Ever since I began reading(shortly after my third birthday, I have pursued interests that have seemed to isolate me increasingly from my chronological peers.

In short, I have always felt slightly out of step without quite knowing exactly why.

Obvious indicators could have been that I was raised in a bicultural home in a foreing country(I'm originally North American)

Other factors, like the fact that my premature birth left me with huge gaps in my visio-spatial abilities were less obvious( most people don't find it alarming if a girl can't find her way or aim properly...)because my motorskills, although mediocre; were not defficient.(whatever difficulties In may have experienced were discounted by most phys ed teachers because of my gender and because I was an extremely fast runner.)

The questions pertain more to what I'd call intellectual differences.

Beyond my utter lack of mathematical skills , my verbal ability has always stunned. Or stung depending on how it was used.

Voracious reading has the uncanny nack of inhibiting ones ability to speak "like everbody else". When I finally succeded in finding more culturally like minded(ie: those who weren't hostile to me for being North American, and unappologetically whiplashing them for mixing up politiancians and the people) I still had to face, disquietingly frequent comments like: "you know...you use really BIG words" or "you're such a walking encylopedia...it's scary!"

I might have taken those kinds of comments as compliments were it not clear that they sprung from deep seated discomfort.

What could I do?

At that time and age many, unfortunately, choose to go underground.

When I tried, I got so sick I had to stop school for a month.and I was seriously considering homeschooling.

All the while as I struggled to hide this part of myself , sinking into what I couldn't describe as anything but living hell, I was torn: "I must not be trying hard enough, after all why wouldn't I be able to enjoy what so many people around me seem to relish, i couldn't be them, they were the majority, society saw them ass being adapted." and slowly the notion that something must have been wrong with [/i]me crept quietly around my thoughts wreaking havoc with my self esteem and emotional well being.

"If I'm as smart as people have hinted, then why are my marks so dismal!? could it be I'm just really good at fooling people into beieving I'm smart? could I actually be stupid?"


These questions were tearing me from within and I set out to find out the root cause of my feelings of inadequacy. That's when I discovered giftedness. At first it was just another curiosity and myths about giftedness were so enshrined in my cranium I refused to believe it could remotely relate to me. But, there were increasingly eerie coincidences:

perhaps I hadn't taught myself greek at age two but I realized I'd been reading since I was three!

After that I connected so many dots I began to form a more accurate picture of what giftedness really was.

Yet, having identified with so many characteristics gleaned from hundereds of research articles(that alone should have tipped me off)
My self esteem had plummeted to such depths it defied even the most masterfully laid out logic. I couldn't adit, let alone accept the possibility of being
that smart.

Clever, perhaps but not gifted. Until I had "scientifically validated proof", I wouldn't allow myself to be lured into a false sense of security.

Shortly thereafter, I stumbled onto an article on twice ewceptional children, children who were exceptional in their abilities but also in their difficulties.

I started thinking about my maths issues and saw an educational psychologist who, insted of providing me with a diagnosis of dyscalculia steered me into the direction of dyspraxia( despite my rather naive insistance that my since my motor skills weren't bothering me, it couldn't be said that I
had dyspraxia)

She administered an IQ test. It was a most peculiar experience, I was useless fumbling frustratedly with tiny red cubes and absolutely unstoppable with the verbal section( on the hardest questions, answers seemed to float to my mind so effortlessly I couldn't believe adults would reasonably be expected to find them challenging!)

When I saw her a few weeks later she told me that evidence for dyspraxia was inconclusive but that my verbal ability was so high, I must have compensated and that I mostly needed to believe in myself.

Nothing I'd read had prepared me for the shock I felt when seeing my skepticism she showed me a bell curve and pointed to where my verbal score placed me compared to the general population "that's three standard deviations [i]above
the mean. Being in the 99th percentile means that you'd have to crowd 740,80 people into a room to meet someone with similar ability"

In retrospect I believe that wasn't the best way to boost my confidence. Sure I stopped trying to fit myself within a norm that didn't correspond with me but it made me feel so isolated, how would I ever find "true peers"? through Mensa or other high IQ societies?(my parents view these as extremely snobby) perhaps through societies that prooted the things I was passionate about? I still don't kow for sure, and not a day goes by that I'm not in some misunderstanding with "normality". WOE IS ME!
please let me know if there is sign of intelligent life!
Guest
 

Postby parnassus » Sat Feb 18, 2006 7:38 pm

In retrospect I believe that wasn't the best way to boost my confidence. Sure I stopped trying to fit myself within a norm that didn't correspond with me but it made me feel so isolated, how would I ever find "true peers"? through Mensa or other high IQ societies?


Gifted people are generally loners - and the greater your intelligence, the more solitary you will be. Quite simply, this is because the number of the people within the top 1% of the population in terms of IQ score are scattered over the face of the earth. There is no way to draft them all into a society and force them to meet twice a month for advanced calculus competitions by way of light recreation.

(my parents view these as extremely snobby) perhaps through societies that prooted the things I was passionate about?


That depends on the society in question. Some high IQ societies offer you a certificate of membership, and nothing more. That disturbs me. What is the use of joining a club like that, unless it is to puff up your ego? I joined NAGTY because it offered scope to my talents and presented me with a whole host of new activities to try. Without NAGTY, I wouldn't have received such a good secondary education. The Academy also helped me to make several good friends, especially Esther (known as Thirteen-thirty-seven on the forum) and Miranda (known as Miranda on the forum).

I still don't kow for sure, and not a day goes by that I'm not in some misunderstanding with "normality". WOE IS ME!


I don't understand why being different should still cause you such pain, as the quotation marks round 'normal' indicate that you know full well that normality is a subjective concept. Secondly, people don't have to be identical to you in cognitive ability in order to be close friends with you. Perhaps you should stop actively seeking out 'similiar' people, as some of my best friends are radically different from me.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
parnassus
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5883
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 8:10 pm
Location: Over here


Return to Debate Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron