US Anti-immigration law

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Postby mattie » Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:37 pm

In my oppinion 9/11 and other events since are symptoms of this inbalance. People hate the Western World, and all that we stand for, because we are selfish.


I agree with the bit about the rich countries being selfish. We have the ability to solve the poverty crisis in Africa, but we're too interested in serving our own interests. :cry:

However, September 11th and other terrorist acts since, are only as a result of religious extremism. Osman Bin Laden and Al-Qaeda have stated their aim as being 'to spread the word of Islam'. They basically want to create a Islamic state, where every country in the world follows the law of Islam. Even poorer countries are not exempt from this terrorist threat, as the terrorist attacks in India and Israel have shown. :cry:


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Postby Page » Sat Aug 05, 2006 7:32 pm

mattie wrote:
I agree with the bit about the rich countries being selfish. We have the ability to solve the poverty crisis in Africa, but we're too interested in serving our own interests. :cry:



Mattie.


how exactly are we supposed to do that?

Many of the problems in Africa stem from the actions of the governments in countries that are affected. (ethnic cleansing, perpetual civil war, etc.) until those problems are resolved and the prople responsible for those problems removed from power, not much is going to change, sadly.

Also, European colonization is partly to blame for this, because the way the countries in Africa were divided up in the Berlin Conference. Borders in Africa were designated rather arbitrarily, with almost no regard for the people living inside said borders. Often this resulted in two ethnic groups who hate each other sharing the same country, which is obviously going to cause problems.
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Postby mattie » Sat Aug 05, 2006 8:24 pm

how exactly are we supposed to do that?


Free trade. Unfortunately, the wealthy countries aren't interested, as it would increase competition and have a damaging affect on their economies. :roll: :x
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Postby Page » Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:57 am

mattie wrote:
how exactly are we supposed to do that?


Free trade. Unfortunately, the wealthy countries aren't interested, as it would increase competition and have a damaging affect on their economies. :roll: :x

Actually, free trade is a boon for the wealthy because it gives free access to nearly unregulated cheap labor.


For example, take the situation where I live. I live about an hour's drive from the Mexican Border. Because of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) , business owners are able to incorporate themselves in the States, but operate out of Tijuana. The benefit is two-fold: The labor costs are considerably diminished, plus it allows the business to avoid those pesky unions. (if you're a business owner, your goal is to completely destroy the unions in your organization or better yet, keep them from forming in the first place) Also, since there are no tariffs under NAFTA, importing from Mexico doesn't cost any extra. This allows businesses to compete by slashing prices, driving down the cost of imported goods. Businesses that operate exclusively in the states don't have this option, so they start feeling the squeeze.


Free trade only benefits large corporations that like to outsource, and the consumers who get better prices out of the deal. Everyone else gets screwed, so I think that free trade is the last thing that Africa needs.
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Postby mattie » Mon Aug 07, 2006 1:49 pm

The idea of free (or fair) trade is that more money goes to the producers, as all trade barriers are removed.

A study of the impact of fair trade was carried out, and found the following (taken from wikipedia):

Several independent studies have recently measured the impact of Fair trade on disadvantaged farmers and workers.

In 2002, Loraine Ronchi of the Poverty Research Unit at the University of Sussex studied the impact of Fair Trade on the Coocafe cooperative in Costa Rica. Ronchi found that Fair Trade strengthened producer organizations and concluded that "in light of the coffee crisis of the early 1990s, Fair Trade can be said to have accomplished its goal of improving the returns to small producers and positively affecting their quality of life and the health of the organisations that represent them locally, nationally and beyond".[18]

In 2003, the Fair Trade Research Group at Colorado State University conducted seven case studies of Latin American Fairtrade coffee producers (UCIRI, CEPCO, Majomut, Las Colinas & El Sincuyo La Selva, Tzotzilotic and La Voz) and concluded that Fair Trade has "in a short time greatly improved the well-being of small-scale coffee farmers and their families"[19] The various case studies most notably found that producers had under Fair Trade greater access to credit and external development funding.[20] The studies also found that Fair Trade producers had, compared to conventional coffee producers, greater access to training and enhanced ability to improve the quality of their coffee.[21]. Families of Fair Trade producers were also said to be more stable and children had better access to education than in families growing conventional coffee.[22]

A case study of Bolivian coffee Fair Trade producers published by Nicolas Eberhart for French NGO Agronomes et Vétérinaires sans frontières in 2005 concluded that Fair Trade certification has had in the Yungas a positive impact on local coffee prices, thus economically benefiting all coffee producers (Fairtrade certified or not). Fair Trade was also said to have strengthened producer organizations and increased their political influence.


It certainly would go a long way to eliminating world poverty. Implementing a minimum wage for all workers, irrespective of which country they come from, would also help IMO.


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