All this about revise, revise, revise.

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All this about revise, revise, revise.

Postby Bladen » Sat May 20, 2006 2:00 pm

Geez, all I'm getting from teachers is orders to revise as much as possible in as little time as possible. THis is annoying, I revise little bits every now and then, hardly makes much of a difference. It's not as if I'm going to get 5 C's anyway. Yes, it's been about 2 months since my last post. I just hate being rushed and pushed into things, you can just never do it your own way can you?
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Postby Joss1991 » Sat May 20, 2006 2:06 pm

what exams are you doing good luck.
I wont be much help in this area all i can say it get the right amount of sleep eat right and dont try to squash all your revsion in the night before the exam.
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Postby parnassus » Sat May 20, 2006 2:44 pm

Best of luck with it, Bladen.

You're right to an extent - cramming your head with as much information as you can in as short a time as you can isn't very helpful; it just makes you get frustrated and forget more. There are better ways to revise than that.

It's not as if I'm going to get 5 C's anyway.


There's nothing like signing your own death warrant...

At psychology A-Level we studied something called self-fulfilling prophecy. If you tell yourself that it is impossible for you to get five C's then you will find the exam papers impossible - even though secretly you are probably capable of passing. You're not thick. You need to find a way of studying that works for you. Even though it may seem really dull, it's worth the effort - education is valuable. (You've probably heard that a hundred times before, but it's true.)

http://www.learning-styles-online.com/i ... ookieset=y

Go to the site above to take a free test. It tells you the way your brain works best. Once you know what you're learning style is, you should be able to make your revision less annoying.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby Bladen » Sun May 21, 2006 2:33 pm

Even if I do well in the exams the best I could come out with is 3 C's.

I'm taking: English Language, English Literature (foundation), DT (graphics foundation), Art. Maths (intermediate), Science (foundation) Applies Science (already took it and got a C) French (foundation) and History (foundation)


French, ARt, DT, Maths and English Language are hard as nails for me, even if I try, revision doesn't really difference me. My school doesn't allow exam choices at all, so I'm stuck with these. That site is dodgy, I've enabled all cookies and still won't load at all, it says I have problems with cookie enabling, If it supported Firefox in the first place then the site would be better....
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Postby parnassus » Sun May 21, 2006 10:28 pm

I am useless at art and DT (I dropped them as soon as possible) but I can try my best to help you prepare for French, history, English language, and literature. I got A*s in all those subjects. What do you find most difficult, and why? Is it essay structure? Remembering dates? Grammar skills? If you give me the main areas of difficulty I will think up some tips that may help. Also let me know what books you're studying for Lit.
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Postby Bladen » Mon May 22, 2006 11:22 am

it's mainly the essasy structures that trouble me, but literature is pretty easy though I'm only doing foundation. The only thing in French I'm good at is reading. I could probably handle History, it's the whole topic of the 20th century US but I'm very good at Germany 1918-1939 though. Eng Lit isn't so hard for me, my Maths problems are things like advanced algebra, geometry and similtaneous equations.

Wow, A*s, I'm only doing foundation, I was close to taking hgiher but the questions were too hard for me, my other problems are trying to make sense of questions, and keeping my writing neat at the same time. I already have a C in Applied Science so that's only 4 more, but I'm not 100% sure my college has a C limit.
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revising

Postby k9ruby » Mon May 22, 2006 4:55 pm

My tips are:

-As vicky said, dont say they will be impossible, if you do they will (trust me)

-start with 1 1/2 an hour session a day, which is split up into 2 15 minute slots. One needs to be the subjects you seriously need to revise, one that you are really good at.
- Make sure you do the not so good one first, and reward yourself with the subject you like doing.

Do this EVERY DAY for 1 week. On sundays have a half session. (as a break)

At first it may feel a bit of a drag, or even that your doing nothing.

The second week, add another hour onto your week. (so sessions increase to 45 minutes a day, but the 15min slots stay the same)

so, monday say was:

Worst subject

Good subject

Worst

Every week add another hour until you doing around 2 hours every night.
The aim is to gradually build up concentration and the revision so its just part of your routine instead of crashing right in.

Make sure you are sleeping and eating well. chocolate helps with me and geiunly makes me concentrate (i learnt this in easter lol)

revise with friends, but revise, not just chat!!!!!

find a way that works for you. revision isnt all about working through textbooks you know!

-Post its around the house
-posters around you room
- revision books
-revsion textbooks
-practice papers
-get people to test you
- record important info on a mp3 player and play when you doing a activity you like or whilst you are getting to sleep
- flashcards
- internet!!!

I highly reccomend the following:

-Bitesize
-Samlearning (V. expensive for home use, so perswade teachers to sign up like our school does lol)
-ITGSCE
-REVISEITC
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Postby Bladen » Mon May 22, 2006 5:25 pm

I revise in my own times, having a fixed agenda makes me concentrate less.
The only subjects I need to get a grip on is Maths and get some hints about the others. I'm fine otherwise, just a bit panicy and fed up about them all.
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Postby kitty_cute » Mon May 22, 2006 7:17 pm

and keeping my writing neat at the same time.


Bladen, do you not get the use of I.T (computer) during your exams? I think this would be useful to you... its like, saved my life! =D
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Postby Bladen » Mon May 22, 2006 8:58 pm

Nope, I'm not allowed, they say I'm fully capable of writing. It sucks.
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Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Tue May 23, 2006 11:52 am

I can help yopu as well. I am doing English Literature, History and French at A-Level. I will help you with all of those. I also have a friend who has just got into Oxford to study Maths. He can help you.

Specially adapted pens like these may help with your handwriting:

http://www.westons.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Hand_Hugger_Pens_13069.html

A good way to improve your listening skills in French is to watch a French film (with English subtitles to help you understand). Also, buy one of those teach-yourself French tapes or CDs (available in most bookshops)

What is it you find hardest about French?

I did the same History syllabus as you. I'm not sure if I still have my old notes (I rarely remember to throw old things out) but I'll have a look.

I didn't find the America part of the syllabus hard. What is it that causes you the most problems? Is it that you don't understand what you have to learn, or that you have trouble writing the essays?

Here is a different learning style test page, although I find the way in which the results are presented slightly confusing. It took me a while to work out what it actually meant. :oops:

Anyway, best of luck.
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Postby Bladen » Wed May 24, 2006 7:37 pm

I just cannot find the main points in French Listening and I make stupid mistakes in reading alot. I learned that my Science exam I did back in January is worth 2 C's as it was a double award. My main problems about the US is the economic boom which is always mentioned on exam papers, I'm good at stuff like the new deal. I got through my ENg Lit exam pretty good, just gotta do Maths Intermediate non Calc and Eng lang. I sturggle with angles and long algebric equations, grids and stuff in maths though.
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Postby Thirteen-thirty-seven » Thu May 25, 2006 10:00 am

A tip for French listening: read the questions beforehand, and make sure you know what to listen out for.

Good luck. :)

I have found some information on the ecopnomic boom in the 1920s for you. I hope it helps:

America was in a fortunate position as the First World War ended. The war had not directly damaged American society and it had led to increased demand for American goods. This resulted in the rapid growth of industry and farming. The economy grew even faster when the war ended.

The keys to America's economic boom were technological progress and increased consumer demand. Businesses began to make huge profits.

Industrial production virtually doubled in the 1920s.

Between 1919 and 1920:

America's gross national product (GNP) grew from $78 billion to $103 billion.
The number of households with a radio rose from 60,000 to 10 million.
The number of people filing income tax returns for earnings of more than $1 million a year rose from 65 to 513.
The number of airline passengers grew from less than 6000 in 1926, to approximately 173,000 in 1929.
The economic boom affected society. Jobs were easy to find and were better paid than before. There was a clear link between prosperity and social change. For example, as middle-class women became better off they enjoyed greater social freedom - they wore make-up, shorter skirts and smoked in public.

Above all, the motor industry (automobiles) grew rapidly. As the cars poured off the production lines there was a need for more rubber to make tyres, glass for windscreens and leather for seats. The man behind the rise of the motor industry was Henry Ford.

Isolationism - the republican government under President Harding (1921-3) and President Coolidge (1923-9) kept out of foreign affairs, and limited foreign competition by imposing high import tariffs. This meant that American companies could make more money, because they didn't have to lower prices to compete with foreign firms.
Technology - especially in the electrical, chemicals and film industries. New businesses were set up to make the new products which had been invented. These new businesses created jobs and wealth.
Mass production - especially in the automobile industry. This meant that many goods could be produced cheaply. This meant the goods cost less, so more people could afford to buy them. This meant that spending increased, so businesses made more money.
Hire purchase - allowed people to purchase new gadgets such as vacuum cleaners, washing machines and refrigerators. Borrowing increased the amount of money available to spend, and, therefore, the demand for goods.
Shares - firms learned to raise money for expansion by selling shares on the Stock Exchange - this was to cause problems later.
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Postby Hermionefan5 » Thu May 25, 2006 12:01 pm

Thirteen-thirty-seven wrote:A tip for French listening: read the questions beforehand, and make sure you know what to listen out for.

Good luck. :)

I have found some information on the ecopnomic boom in the 1920s for you. I hope it helps:

America was in a fortunate position as the First World War ended. The war had not directly damaged American society and it had led to increased demand for American goods. This resulted in the rapid growth of industry and farming. The economy grew even faster when the war ended.

The keys to America's economic boom were technological progress and increased consumer demand. Businesses began to make huge profits.

Industrial production virtually doubled in the 1920s.

Between 1919 and 1920:

America's gross national product (GNP) grew from $78 billion to $103 billion.
The number of households with a radio rose from 60,000 to 10 million.
The number of people filing income tax returns for earnings of more than $1 million a year rose from 65 to 513.
The number of airline passengers grew from less than 6000 in 1926, to approximately 173,000 in 1929.
The economic boom affected society. Jobs were easy to find and were better paid than before. There was a clear link between prosperity and social change. For example, as middle-class women became better off they enjoyed greater social freedom - they wore make-up, shorter skirts and smoked in public.

Above all, the motor industry (automobiles) grew rapidly. As the cars poured off the production lines there was a need for more rubber to make tyres, glass for windscreens and leather for seats. The man behind the rise of the motor industry was Henry Ford.

Isolationism - the republican government under President Harding (1921-3) and President Coolidge (1923-9) kept out of foreign affairs, and limited foreign competition by imposing high import tariffs. This meant that American companies could make more money, because they didn't have to lower prices to compete with foreign firms.
Technology - especially in the electrical, chemicals and film industries. New businesses were set up to make the new products which had been invented. These new businesses created jobs and wealth.
Mass production - especially in the automobile industry. This meant that many goods could be produced cheaply. This meant the goods cost less, so more people could afford to buy them. This meant that spending increased, so businesses made more money.
Hire purchase - allowed people to purchase new gadgets such as vacuum cleaners, washing machines and refrigerators. Borrowing increased the amount of money available to spend, and, therefore, the demand for goods.
Shares - firms learned to raise money for expansion by selling shares on the Stock Exchange - this was to cause problems later.


I remember this stuff from American History. I think it's too bad that we don't have to learn more European history. You seem to know so much of ours! :)
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Postby Bladen » Thu May 25, 2006 5:07 pm

Cheers for the info. even if I read the questions I can never do any good on the things where you write what you hear, stuff like box ticking is easiest for me.
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