Studying

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Studying

Postby Skinny3600 » Tue Mar 31, 2009 12:54 pm

Im meant to study constantly for my As levels in college, its the defenition of mission impossible, i have absolutley no idea how you study :S i read through it but its no help at all it my mind goes blank :O luckily i catch the things in lesson that help me scrape by in my exams (passing grade) but if im to go to uni im gonna have to try and learn more.
Any ideas?
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Re: Studying

Postby Rosie-posie » Wed Apr 01, 2009 10:37 pm

try breaking things down into spider diagrams or mind maps or put key phrases on post it notes
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Re: Studying

Postby Star » Sun Apr 05, 2009 6:28 pm

Use ther 'look, cover, write, check method' Boring but effective.
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Re: Studying

Postby parnassus » Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:59 pm

Skinny3600 wrote:Im meant to study constantly for my As levels in college, its the defenition of mission impossible, i have absolutley no idea how you study :S i read through it but its no help at all it my mind goes blank :O luckily i catch the things in lesson that help me scrape by in my exams (passing grade) but if im to go to uni im gonna have to try and learn more.
Any ideas?


It's good that you've already worked out what isn't effective. Reading is not the only way of studying, so don't try and force yourself through a mound of textbooks if you've already identified that it won't work. What you say about catching things in class makes it sound as though you are more of an auditory learner, so you will need to choose revision methods that match your learning style Here are some alternative methods of studying:

1.) Get permission to tape important lessons and listening to the tape in the evenings before you begin your homework. When I was at school my special needs teacher provided me with a Dictaphone for this purpose. You can pick them up quite cheaply on the Internet or at shops like Argos if your special needs department doesn't have any.

2.) Watch relevant videos. You can get subject-specific videos that are designed for A-level revision, and your teachers should be able to provide you with some if you ask for them. Even better than revision videos is material that deals with your subject in a more passionate and engaging way - documentaries, films, even theatre. If you tell us what subjects you're doing we could all try to come up with a list of good suggestions.

3.) When you read, do not try to read whole chapters at a time if it doesn't go in. Work out how much you can read without your concentration wandering. Once you have reached your limit, grab a piece of paper and a colourful pen and make a spider diagram to show what you have just read in a visual way. If spider diagrams and mind-maps aren't easy for you either, try reciting what you've just read into the Dictaphone in your own words, and then playing it back. Imagine that you are giving the information to somebody who has never heard of it before, and be as detailed as possible.

4.) Before you begin to study, write down what your objectives are. For example, if I were revising for my psychology A-level all over again I might have:

* Learn the major models of memory;
* Research at least two key studies for each model of memory, including the dates of the study and the names of the psychologists involved.

Don't set yourself too many targets, and keep your targets very specific. This will keep you from getting distracted by other information. At the end of your study session, write down what you have achieved, e.g.:

1.) I have learnt about the theory of working memory outlined by Baddeley and Hitch, and the multi-store model of memory outlined by Atkinson and Schiffrin.
2.) I have found three studies that support the conclusions of Baddeley and Hitch and four that are based on the work of Atkinson and Schiffrin.

Conclude with a list of where you need to go from here:

1.) I need to study the relationship between memory and language in more depth.
2.) I need to look into memory and eye witness testimony (start with the work of Elizabeth Loftus).

Making revision plans as you go along will help you to see that you're actually learning more than you might realise, and it will help you to keep your studying organised and methodical. Often people waste a lot of effort by not using a proper plan. Good luck.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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