Wud u want to be dyspraxic if you had the option not to be?

Chat with others about dyspraxia and share your experiences.

Wud u want to be dyspraxic if you had the option not to be?

Postby fuzzy » Fri Jul 29, 2005 11:02 pm

If you had the power to stop being dyspraxic, would you? Iv heard of an organisation called DORE- it helps ppl with dylexia, dsypraxia, mild autism and ADHD sufferers. The courses claim to improve the signals and connections in your brain which are poorly developed by making you do specilly adapted daily excersizes. Its got a high sucess rate and the effects are meant to be long term, but its not gaurenteed to work (although it usually does and has brill results) and costs about 2 grand for a year! What does everyone think of this? Would you want to change your dyspraxia? Or do you think that if you werent dyspraxic you would not be the same person? Im worryed that it'll change who I am, as dyspraxia shapes who I am. Check out the website and let me know what you think- you mite even wanna do it yourself. Its www.ddat.co.uk
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Postby madame_tigre » Sat Jul 30, 2005 8:43 am

I don't want to go on an expensive programme to change the way I am. If people have a problem with Dyspraxics, then I think they should go on a programme which will make them less ignorant and more tolerant and patient :P
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Postby parnassus » Sat Jul 30, 2005 9:27 am

I am very suspicious of DDAT. If you look at the David Mulhall Centre's website, you will find the people there gushing about their wonderful new treatment for dyspraxia, dyslexia, and company. The cause, according to Mulhall, is the retention of primitive reflexes. These can be eradicated through a treatment known as 'brushing', where the nerve endings are realigned. There are many people who claim to have been helped by Mulhall's treatment. Yet according to the DORE achievement centres, learning difficulties have nothing to do with primitive reflexes - it is the connections in the cerebellum that are at fault.

More recently, the Cure Autism Now group (CAN) have decided that autism and related disorders are triggered by mercury poisoning. They have developed the perfect treatment for us, based on this theory.

You see the problem?

I am inclined to be suspicious of anyone who claims to have found a definitive cause - let alone a definitive cure - for any of these complicated and mysterious difficulties. DDAT, Mulhall, mercury removal (though this one sounds decidedly crackpot to me), special diets - they may all have a beneficial effect, depending on the individual, but they shouldn't be hailed as cures, because they aren't.

There is another reason why DDAT worries me. At one time it purported to offer cures just for dyspraxia, dyslexia, and AD/HD, based on the cerebellum theory. Since 'Aspergermania' kicked off with the publication of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, which sent autism awareness rocketing to the stars, DDAT have thoughtfully begun to offer help for high-functioning autistic people - no doubt because the number of diagnoses has risen sharply since people became more autism-aware last year. Brain scans of autistic people frequently show slight abnormalities in the amygdala, whereas people with (developmental) dyspraxia or dyslexia do not usually have physically apparent neurological differences. And autism, like dyslexia, dyspraxia, and AD/HD, is meant to originate in the cerebellum, yes? Perhaps I'm just being cynical, but I think DDAT know they're onto an earner.

I go to occupational therapy and special education classes quite willingly, because they help me. But I would never shell out thousands of pounds to anyone who offered to 'correct' me. Dyspraxic people often have difficulties with self-esteem as it is - and is it any wonder, when half the world, his mother, and his second cousin are determined to 'cure' us? That makes us sound diseased. It also suggests that dyspraxia is wholly bad, and that isn't true.

I am proud of who I am, what I've got, and how far I've come. It's taken me a long time to develop this self-belief, and I wouldn't exchange it for the opportunity to play Olympic hockey or a short-term memory that is absolutely watertight. I've met precious few normal eighteen-year-olds who are as happy with their lot as I am with mine. I agree with Roseanna. If people can't accept - or at the very least tolerate - my personality, then that's their loss. Not mine.

Embark on a DDAT course if you would like to - there's no denying it does help people, although you can't rule out a placebo effect - but don't look on it as a cure. If you are born with learning differences, you will always have learning differences. Thankfully.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby fuzzy » Sat Jul 30, 2005 1:43 pm

Look I never said it was a cure. Your all taking this very personally! Its not about pride; its about making your life easier by getting help. I admit its a lot of money and therefore suspect, but I can understand why ppl would go on the course and it doesnt make you an ignorant person.
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Postby parnassus » Sat Jul 30, 2005 3:47 pm

No one said anything about it making you an ignorant person. I agree that it is natural to want help - this is why I do occupational therapy and receive special education - but the DORE centres aim to do more than just help their clients. They aim to cure them. The homepage of their website makes me more and more indignant every time I see it:

Are you looking for help with any of the following?

Reading Difficulties
Spelling problems
Poor handwriting
Poor concentration
Clumsiness
Poor sporting ability
Poor memory
Low self-esteem
Dyslexia
Dyspraxia
ADD & ADHD
Aspergers Syndrome

The Dore Programme is an exercised based treatment that deals with the root cause of the problem - offering you a solution to all of the difficulties listed above.


It sounds so nice and neat. They've got the cause, they've got the cure.

In that case, why do the Dyspraxia Foundation and the Dyslexia Institute urge people to treat DDAT with 'extreme caution'? I once asked a DDAT practitioner what he thought about this, when he tried to convince me to sign onto the programme. His response was, "The Dyspraxia Foundation and all the other groups know that we've got it right at DDAT. They're just scared that all their members will get cured, and then they'll lose their cash flow!"

So I pointed out that the Dyspraxia Foundation and the Dyslexia Institute are non-profit making, charitable organisations. He waved that one aside.

I do know one dyslexic boy who did a DDAT programme and benefited from it. His handwriting is legible now, although it still takes him approximately twice as long to read a book or write an essay than it would take a non-dyslexic. I asked to look at his exercise programme, and to be honest about half the exercises might have been lifted from a physio- or an occupational therapist's handbook. It looks as if half the DORE programme is occupational therapy in fancy dress. To an extent, that makes sense. Occupational and physiotherapy work. They have been on the go for years. But they're cheaper than DDAT...

If you really want to have a go at DDAT, then no one here will think any the worse of you for it. Because you asked for our thoughts on the DORE procedure, we gave you a personal response - but we weren't attacking you, or your desire for DDAT treatment. I was actually responding to the claims on their website when I wrote all that stuff about searching for cures. The DORE officials may tell you that they're going to make you better - they tried to tell me that. Just so long as you know that they can't, you'll be OK.

For me, this is a question of personal pride, although I appreciate that not everyone feels the same. The DDAT ideas might not hurt everyone, but they did hurt me. It all comes down to this again:

The Dore Programme is an exercised based treatment that deals with the root cause of the problem...


My special needs teacher tells all her dyspraxic students, "Dyspraxia isn't an imperfection - just a different way of thinking. There are no learning disabilities - just learning differences. Sometimes your differences will cause you problems, but that's not your fault. I'm here to help you with that. We have to meet these special needs of yours, but we must never take them away entirely. That would be like taking your mind away." I believe that with all my heart. So does my occupational therapist, which is why I trust her.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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Postby fuzzy » Sat Jul 30, 2005 5:03 pm

Maybe I should try occupational therapy. I didnt know the dyspraxia foundation disapproved of them- thats quite interesting. I respect your opinion, but for me its a matter of making my life easier and being able to manage my difficulties more easily, although I dont want it to change who I am so thats why Im in two minds about the whole thing.
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DDAT

Postby k9ruby » Sat Jul 30, 2005 5:29 pm

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2005 3:47 pm Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top
No one said anything about it making you an ignorant person. I agree that it is natural to want help - this is why I do occupational therapy and receive special education - but the DORE centres aim to do more than just help their clients. They aim to cure them. The homepage of their website makes me more and more indignant every time I see it:

Quote:
Are you looking for help with any of the following?

Reading Difficulties
Spelling problems
Poor handwriting
Poor concentration
Clumsiness
Poor sporting ability
Poor memory
Low self-esteem
Dyslexia
Dyspraxia
ADD & ADHD
Aspergers Syndrome

The Dore Programme is an exercised based treatment that deals with the root cause of the problem - offering you a solution to all of the difficulties listed above.


It sounds so nice and neat. They've got the cause, they've got the cure.

In that case, why do the Dyspraxia Foundation and the Dyslexia Institute urge people to treat DDAT with 'extreme caution'? I once asked a DDAT practitioner what he thought about this, when he tried to convince me to sign onto the programme. His response was, "The Dyspraxia Foundation and all the other groups know that we've got it right at DDAT. They're just scared that all their members will get cured, and then they'll lose their cash flow!"

So I pointed out that the Dyspraxia Foundation and the Dyslexia Institute are non-profit making, charitable organisations. He waved that one aside.

I do know one dyslexic boy who did a DDAT programme and benefited from it. His handwriting is legible now, although it still takes him approximately twice as long to read a book or write an essay than it would take a non-dyslexic. I asked to look at his exercise programme, and to be honest about half the exercises might have been lifted from a physio- or an occupational therapist's handbook. It looks as if half the DORE programme is occupational therapy in fancy dress. To an extent, that makes sense. Occupational and physiotherapy work. They have been on the go for years. But they're cheaper than DDAT...

If you really want to have a go at DDAT, then no one here will think any the worse of you for it. Because you asked for our thoughts on the DORE procedure, we gave you a personal response - but we weren't attacking you, or your desire for DDAT treatment. I was actually responding to the claims on their website when I wrote all that stuff about searching for cures. The DORE officials may tell you that they're going to make you better - they tried to tell me that. Just so long as you know that they can't, you'll be OK.

For me, this is a question of personal pride, although I appreciate that not everyone feels the same. The DDAT ideas might not hurt everyone, but they did hurt me. It all comes down to this again:

Quote:
The Dore Programme is an exercised based treatment that deals with the root cause of the problem...


My special needs teacher tells all her dyspraxic students, "Dyspraxia isn't an imperfection - just a different way of thinking. There are no learning disabilities - just learning differences. Sometimes your differences will cause you problems, but that's not your fault. I'm here to help you with that. We have to meet these special needs of yours, but we must never take them away entirely. That would be like taking your mind away." I believe that with all my heart. So does my occupational therapist, which is why I trust her.



Ditto vicky!! Iam very suspicious of these mircal 'cures' although i think the GF/CF diet for autistic people is geniune! Im proud to be dyspraxic, Yes it may have its downsides, but it has made me one hell OF A DETERMIND PERSON!!!!!! If other people have a problem with that, too bad!
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Postby parnassus » Sat Jul 30, 2005 6:49 pm

Ruby, it's great to see someone who is so proud of themselves and the personal qualities that they have developed as a result of their dyspraxia. I first 'met' you on Matt's forum when you were eleven, and I remember being wowed by your attitude to life even then. Your dyspraxia isn't exactly mild, and you have a lot to contend with on top of it - yet you've never been anything but accepting. Your attitude is something to be proud of in itself.

With all due respect, though, your school has given you a lot of assistance that most people haven't had. Twelve hours of learning support, physiotherapy, the use of a laptop, permission to leave lessons early in order to avoid crowds, extra time in tests, and a modified PE curriculum - coupled with DLA - have no doubt given you a much-needed leg-up in the educational world. It isn't like that for the vast majority of people. I doubt that Fuzzy got that level of support - maybe if she had, she wouldn't even need to consider signing on for DDAT treatment. If all schools were as understanding as yours, Wynford Dore would be out of business.

Fuzzy, the Dyspraxia Foundation does't disapprove of DDAT per se. They are just a bit wary at the moment - in their newsletter they stressed that they would have to see a lot more scientific research being done into the DORE treatment before they could, in good conscience, recommend it to a parent or a dyspraxic person.

I think you should play it safe and go for occupational therapy. If you apply for it free via the NHS, you will probably face a long wait - it depends what the provision in your area is like. If you go privately, you will be seen at once, but it would still probably work out cheaper than the DDAT. At least occupational therapy guarantees some improvement for every person who takes part. The level of improvement varies from person to person - it tends to be more effective when you're younger. I haven't responded as well to my programme as a seven-year-old would, but I've still responded. Save DDAT for a last resort. It is an awful lot of money to spend.

I wish you good luck with whatever you do.
"This above all, to thine own self be true." - Polonius, Hamlet.
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DDAT

Postby k9ruby » Sat Jul 30, 2005 6:55 pm

Your right, but it wasn't always like that, I just got lucky in sencondary school!

You should of seen me in my first primary school...*shudders*...

Fuzzy, I would see an OT because mine gave me loads of tips, and advice!!!
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Postby _C_ » Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:42 pm

I am who I am being dyspraxic. I dont want to change a thing about me but somedays when im really low i cant help but wish that i fitted in a little bit more and that more people understand me.

Sure this therapy may well "re-align" the nerves but it cant change your brain. It can make you better at writing or kicking a bll or something like that but end of the day - the brain is a complex object that wasnt designed to be messed with and shouldnt be.
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Postby fuzzy » Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:04 am

_C_, it claims to improve connections in your brain through excersize; its not extensive brain surgery or anything else intrusive; you make it sound like they get a chisel and hameer and hack thier way through your skull, fiddle with your brain and pop it back in again!

Parnasuss, your rite- I actually had no support through school until my second last year. By this point I had done my GCSE Scottish equivents (standard grades) without any extra time, laptops, etc. In my highers (AS levels) I got an extra 15 minutes of extra time per hour, only because I had the sense to approach LS- not the other way round. Not once in high school was I recommedned to see anyone about difficulties I experienced, prob because I was a good grade student. I had a referall when I was 7, saw an occupational therapist and still no diagnoses or recommendations were made- the general concesus was that I was slow or somethng :evil: So yes, perhaps if there had been more awareness about dyspraxia when I was at school, and if my family was supportive about it in stead of labelling me as stupid when Im obviously not, things would have been much easier and I would not be in the position I am now, internally struggling with whether or not to accept me and my difficulties, or get help by any means. Many of you have been extremly lucky to have had a lot of support at school and at home- but Iv never had that. This is the first time in my life that I have ever spoken to anyone else with dyspraxia and found comfort in knowing that there are others with difficulties and frustrations like mine- Iv only had that since April this year since I joined this board and met you guys (a liberating experince :) )- a few months out of 19 years. Its all very well to be proud of what you are, a dyspraxic person, if you have been brought up with that mentality- but if your brought up in the dark, being called slow, stupid, thick and simple, and basically ahamed of who you are, it is very difficult to change those ideas. Although Iv known Im dyspraxic for about 2 years, I still feel a pang of shame telling ppl what/ who I am, not becuse I think dyspraxia is bad, but because Iv had that negative mentality drilled into me, and thats something that is exceptinally difficult to break out of. Anyway, Iv probably throughly depressed or angered you all now. My job of being an exceptional pain in the ass is, for tonite, done.
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Postby fuzzy » Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:11 am

PS- thanks for the advice Ruby and Vicky about occupational therapists.

Everyone- sorry for being such a moan! :oops: :roll: Hopefully you all got the point that it may be easy for others to be proud of who they are, but very hard for me.
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Postby madame_tigre » Sun Jul 31, 2005 9:59 am

fuzzy wrote:Everyone- sorry for being such a moan! :oops: :roll: Hopefully you all got the point that it may be easy for others to be proud of who they are, but very hard for me.


I understand and respect your opinion. I apologise if my post yesterday offended you, that's just how I personally felt about it.
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Postby fuzzy » Sun Jul 31, 2005 12:59 pm

Thats ok- thanks for tolerating my constant bemoaning, Im suprised anyone on this site is still speaking to me at all
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Postby fuzzy » Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:00 pm

(but obviously happy that they are :) )
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